Feeds

NASA shops for new Moon spacesuits and landers

'Not your father's moonship', insists space agency

SANS - Survey on application security programs

NASA's return to the Moon with manned missions - planned to commence from 2020 - has taken some early steps in recent days. The space agency awarded a contract for its new generation of moonwalker spacesuits, and US defence globocorp Boeing submitted proposals for the new "Altair" lunar lander.

NASA concept art of the new suits and moon lander in action

Beer cans rated for helmet connection and vacuum conditions are surprisingly large. Fortunately gravity was light.

The new spacesuits are to be made by Oceaneering International. The firm, as its name suggests, does most of its business underwater - offering all kinds of deep-sea, diving and remotely-operated robosub services. But Oceaneering also does things in the space sector, in particular running NASA's well-known extravehicular activity (EVA) training tank. (Neutral buoyancy is the best long-term simulation for microgravity available without going into space.)

Oceaneering scooped an initial deal last June for next-gen space suits to be used in the new era of NASA manned spaceflight aboard the Constellation spaceships, using Ares lift stacks and Orion capsules. The new interim letter contract which becomes effective today requires Oceaneering "to begin work on the basic period of performance while NASA and the company negotiate the contract's final terms".

Development of a new range of specialist moonwalking suits is planned to begin from 2011. Comparatively ordinary kit to be worn inside spacecraft and on occasional EVAs in space is to be delivered from 2015, the planned start of the Constellation programme.

Meanwhile, the first development stages of the Moon ships and base plans are now starting in earnest. US aerospace giant Boeing announced on Friday that it had submitted a proposal to NASA to supply early design and engineering services for the "Altair" lunar lander programme. This project is at an early stage at present, with the space agency some distance from settling on a final design or a builder.

"Boeing is uniquely positioned to provide great design support now, as well as to support Altair development, test and evaluation when the time comes," said exec Keith Riley.

Altair landers will be substantially more capable than the Apollo ones, according to NASA - no doubt keen to refute accusations that it is merely repeating the Apollo programme of the 1960s and 70s. The next-gen moonships, which will meet up with their crews in Earth orbit, are expected to deliver four astronauts and 15+ tons of cargo to lunar surface and stay there for up to six months before the upper stage lifts off for a return journey.

NASA emphasises that there will be no need for astronauts to remain in Moon orbit as there was with Apollo, and that the new Moon expeditions will last far longer than those of yesteryear: hopefully to the extent where a permanently manned base can be kept up, though this will depend on conditions in the Moon's polar craters. If it proves possible to find areas with access to water ice and constant sunlight, running a lunar base will be far less difficult and costly: hence survey orbiters are planned to launch shortly.

Here's a NASA vid of how the agency sees its initial 2020s moonshots going, complete with spacesuited astronauts:

For now, though, NASA is about to cease manned spaceflight by its own efforts as the space shuttle fleet heads for retirement. The new Constellation astronaut lifters, combining an Ares I rocket with the Orion capsule as shown in the vid, should start flying to the International Space Station in six years or so. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Fancy joining Reg hack on quid-a-day challenge?
Recruiting now for charity starvation diet
Red-faced LOHAN team 'fesses up in blown SPEARS fuse fiasco
Standing in the corner, big pointy 'D' hats
KILLER SPONGES menacing California coastline
Surfers are safe, crustaceans less so
LOHAN's Punch and Judy show relaunches Thursday
Weather looking good for second pop at test flights
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully
Clandestine NRO spacecraft sets off on its unknown mission
New FEMTO-MOON sighted BIRTHING from Saturn's RING
Icy 'Peggy' looks to be leaving the outer rings
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.