Feeds

Intel preps ultra-thin notebook chips

You can't be too rich or too ultra-thin

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Intel will soon release two new ultra-low voltage (ULV) processors designed for ultra-thin notebooks.

According to DigiTimes, the company will unveil the 1.6GHz Core 2 Duo SU9600 and the 1.4GHz Core 2 Solo SU3500 next month. Prices will be $289 (£202) and $262 (£183), respectively, in 1000-unit quantities, the Taiwanese pub said.

Ultra-thin notebooks are suddenly all the rage, but with prices for their processors hovering in the mid-to-high $200 range they're not going to compete with netbooks powered by Intel's $44 (£31) Atom N270.

Nor should they. Ultra-thins are designed for the style-savvy traveler who is willing to forgo a full-fledged notebook's higher level of performance and capabilities in return for ultra-portability and ultra-élan. Think Apple's MacBook Air, Sony's Vaio TT, or Dell's upcoming Adamo.

Both are designed for use with Intel's Mobile GS45 Express Chipset, which also support the company's existing consumer ultra-low voltage line. The line includes the 1.4GHz SU9400 ($289, £202), SU9300 ($262, £183), 1.2GHz SU3300 ($262, £183), and 1.2GHz Celeron M ULV 723 ($161, £112).

DigiTimes' source didn't comment on whether the introduction of the new chips would be accompanied by a change in Intel's pricing structure.

If priced as reported, the new chips will heat up an already bubbling ultra-thin market. Reports, for example, of a new Intel ULV chip designed for ultra-thins surfaced at CES earlier this year, as competition to AMD's current Neo processor designed for that company's Yukon platform and a dual-core Neo set for release later this year.

An Intel spokesperson declined to confirm or deny the purported new ULV chips, saying that the company doesn't "comment on speculation and rumors."

Fair enough - but she did dangle one tantalizing hint, saying that "Intel will offer ULV in many different and new flavors over this next year." ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Sonos AXES support for Apple's iOS4 and 5
Want to use your iThing? You can't - it's too old
You didn't get the MeMO? Asus Pad 7 Android tab is ... not bad
Really, er, stands out among cheapie 7-inchers
Apple winks at parents: C'mon, get your kid a tweaked Macbook Pro
Cheapest models given new processors, more RAM
4K video on terrestrial TV? Not if the WRC shares frequencies to mobiles
Have your say with Ofcom now, before Freeview becomes Feeview
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS
Old hardware doesn't get any faster with new software
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.