Feeds

The internet is for violent jerks, study finds

...or violent jerks are for the internet

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Does the internet change folks into assholes? Or do assholes just naturally gravitate to using the internet?

While the question may never truly be answered by modern science, new research suggests the asshole-to-user ratio isn't just in your imagination.

In a study of 9,405 Taiwanese teenagers, a team of researchers at Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan claim those with signs of "internet addiction" were more likely to say they've hit, shoved, or threatened someone in the past year. The findings were published online by the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The boffins labeled about 25 per cent of the boys and 13 per cent of the girls as internet addicts, based on questioners about their online and offline behavior. According to the team, signs of addiction include a preoccupation with online activities, "withdrawal" symptoms like irritability if unable to access the internet, and skipping real-world endeavors in favor of the warming glow of a monitor.

While 13 per cent of all the female students and 32 per cent of the males reported aggressive behavior in the past year, 37 per cent of those profiled as addicted reported a toss-up.

That doesn't seem like a huge jump for males, but the researchers say the bump could be the result of activities like online video games and sexually-oriented web sites positively enforcing aggressive behavior.

Or, of course, it could be that jerks just love the 'net.

Whether internet addiction itself deserves our skeptical "quotation marks" on first reference is a subject of debate amongst brain dysfunction connoisseurs.

Some believe being hooked on cyberspace is an actual clinical disorder suffered largely by "highly educated, socially awkward men" and making serious headway with middle-aged women spending hours on their computers.

China's ministry of health defines a 'net addict as someone who spends at least six hours a day on the web and suffers sleeplessness, lack of concentration, and yearnings to get back online.

Bootnote

Others — as I'm told on internet message boards — believe 'net addicts are a bunch of pansies that need to walk it off or get smacked right in the mouth. Then again, it's probably not a good idea to consult the assholes. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
MEN WANTED to satisfy town full of yearning BRAZILIAN HOTNESS
'Prettier, better organised, more harmonious than if men were in charge'
Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD
'Officers were unable to determine Chicken's intent'
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!
Put it away boys. Cover them up ladies. Your credit cards, we mean
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'
US court hears of cached browser image - not actual request
Chomp that sausage: Brits just LOVE scoffing a Full Monty
Sales of traditional brekkie foods soar as hungry folk get their mitts greasy
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?