Feeds

Grifters punt 'get rich quick' scams at Facebook users

Social networking marks made an offer you can refuse

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Grifters are using Facebook to lend credibility to an elaborate get rich quick scam designed to trick punters into handing over credit card details.

The ruse begins with an ad on Facebook touting an offer to "get paid for posting links – Google will pay you great money for doing this". Users who respond to the come-on by clicking on a link are taken to a page where someone who's supposedly become rich through the scheme relates his story.

On the same page there’s a link to something called a "Google advertising" kit. Surfers who decide to find more about this are taken to a page called emillionaire.inc

This, in turn, leads to another page where punters are invited to enter their details to see if they’re eligible for this type of job. Only prospective marks from the UK, US, Canada and Australia are eligible. Prospective marks are invited to pay $1.90, using a debit or credit card, to take part.

Users receive nothing in return promoting complaints on Facebook from punters who have been taken in by the ruse, net security firm Trend Micro reports.

"There’s a forum where someone called 'Sophie from Belfast' is seeking advice as she fell for the scam and is now afraid her details are out there somewhere. Someone else from the US has also posted complaints that money had been taken from her," according to Rik Ferguson, senior security advisor at Trend Micro.

"Facebook Inc is obviously realising revenue from the advertisements they serve on behalf of these scammers, which calls into doubt the efficacy of Facebook's advertiser vetting procedure," Ferguson told El Reg.

An example of a dubious money making ad circulating on Facebook can be found here.

In other Facebook-related security threat news, a picture ruse that first appeared in November has been given a new lease of life, Trend reports.

Targeted Facebook users are informed that they have been "tagged" in an album by a currently online friend. Users are invited to visit a site called Stealpics.com but this is just a ruse designed to get users onto a site punting an electronic credit card at hugely disadvantageous terms.

Previous versions of the album tagging bait sent users on a merry dance while harvesting email addresses but nothing to do with duping them into signing up for services of dubious worth, as with the latest variant of the approach. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION
You thought you were all alone? Nope – change your password, says ICO
You really need to do some tech support for Aunty Agnes
Free anti-virus software, expires, stops updating and p0wns the world
Meet OneRNG: a fully-open entropy generator for a paranoid age
Kiwis to seek random investors for crowd-funded randomiser
USB coding anarchy: Consider all sticks licked
Thumb drive design ruled by almighty buck
Patch NOW! Microsoft slings emergency bug fix at Windows admins
Vulnerability promotes lusers to domain overlords ... oops
Attack reveals 81 percent of Tor users but admins call for calm
Cisco Netflow a handy tool for cheapskate attackers
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.