Feeds

UK 'bad' pics ban to stretch?

Is that a loophole? How disgusting

SANS - Survey on application security programs

This is an unfortunate position, for two reasons. First, many quite respected artists have mingled art and sex quite freely in the past: perhaps Mr Starmer is unaware of the works of Aubrey Beardsley (NSFW)?

Second, the offence under existing child abuse law is "strict liability": the intention of the creator is not an issue, giving rise to cases such as that of Dr Marcus Phillips, who was found guilty of creating indecent images, despite a court acknowledging that there was no sexual intent. Either Mr Starmer is being disingenuous, or does not know his law very well.

He also confirmed that the law should catch "any pornographic image scrawled on a piece of paper": even, presumably, an image that an individual created for their own use and no other.

Last word goes to Miss Willott. Speaking to us at length, she said: "The Coroners and Justice Bill as a whole is a real hodge-podge of measures, with many ideas in it that seem to have been only half thought-out.

"This is the case with the sections on possession of Cartoon images... We are being asked to choose between two conflicting world views: on the one hand, there is a belief in the 'slippery slope', that looking at images habituates individuals to the actions involved and can increase the risk to children; on the other it is argued that these images act as a release and actually reduce the incidence of harm.

"It is worrying that we appear to be legislating on this subject without hard evidence either way – especially when getting it wrong could have such serious implications for children. We have passed laws against possessing indecent images of children, because such images are evidence of harm committed: that is clearly not the case with CGI imagery, and before we criminalise it, we should be prepared to come up with evidence of harm caused by the impact of seeing that image.

As for the streaming issue, Miss Willott felt that this was further evidence of things not being thought through. As far as she was concerned, "the Law as it is written would not criminalise people for looking at images. It is about possession. If the government wishes to take the further step of making it illegal to look, then they need to change what the Bill says.

"Even so, it is not at all clear that the technology to do this sort of thing exists: they would be criminalising an action that they cannot police, which is not good law-making practice." ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Lavabit loses contempt of court appeal over protecting Snowden, customers
Judges rule complaints about government power are too little, too late
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Don't let no-hire pact suit witnesses call Steve Jobs a bullyboy, plead Apple and Google
'Irrelevant' character evidence should be excluded – lawyers
EFF: Feds plan to put 52 MILLION FACES into recognition database
System would identify faces as part of biometrics collection
Ex-Tony Blair adviser is new top boss at UK spy-hive GCHQ
Robert Hannigan to replace Sir Iain Lobban in the autumn
Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
Reprieve for Weev: Court disowns AT&T hacker's conviction
Appeals court strikes down landmark sentence
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.