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Man U fan pwned in Facebook honeypot

'Emma' actually Liverpudlian hoaxers

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A Manchester United fan who drove 400 miles for an amorous rendevous with a woman he wooed on Facebook discovered he'd been well and truly stitched up by a couple of Liverpudlian pranksters.

Stuart Slann, 39, met the pair on a holiday in Cancun, Mexico, last November. According to the Telegraph, the three soon started giving it some gob about their rival football teams, and Slann was subsequently thrown into the swimming pool by the Liverpool fans.

Back in Blighty, the two decided to further humiliate their victim, and set up a Facebook page under the name of "Emma" - a Scottish temptress who began to flirt with the unsuspecting Slann. After a month of preliminaries, Emma arranged a face-to-face with her beau in Aberdeen, and he duly drove from Sheffield to the remote farm where he expected to have his evil way with his online girlfriend.

Slann explained: "I'd been chatting to this girl on Facebook for about a month or so. I really thought she was genuine, and I had no reason to doubt it. On the night she asked me to Scotland I was on the road for about nine hours. And then when I got to this remote farm she sent me a text to say she was still in work.

"That's what made it worse, not only had I driven for nine hours, but I had to wait for about another three and a half hours for her to finish work."

Finally, one of the Liverpudlians rang to tell Slann the terrible truth. The recorded conversation last week escaped into the wild, and has since popped up on YouTube. The recording contains further humiliating details of the hoax, and is NSFW:

Slann said: "There's no doubt that I've been done good and proper by the lads from Liverpool. It was cruel but I'll hold my hands up and say they really wound me up."

He concluded: "If they had asked to drive to Manchester, Leeds or even Liverpool it wouldn't have been so bad and maybe I'd have seen the funny side. But to drag me all the way to Aberdeen was just cruel."

Slann's wife Louise, 32, discovered the "affair" last week when the whole sorry tale went public. The Slann's marriage "is now over", the Telegraph notes. ®

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