Feeds

Adobe and Nokia pledge $10m for Flash and AIR apps

Mobile PDF rewritten

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Adobe and Nokia are offering developers a Google-size pile of cash as incentive to write applications for Flash Player and AIR running across different types of devices.

The companies today unveil a $10m fund to assist development and marketing of applications that further the Open Screen Project. They are making the announcement at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.

Adobe and Nokia will determine the allocation of grants and expect fellow members of the Open Screen Project to add funds in time. Details of who qualifies for a grant will be announced today at the show.

Created last May and led by Adobe, the alliance is as a way to deploy Flash and AIR on a broad range of devices. Other members include LG Electronics and Sony Ericsson, Intel and ARM, Verizon, the BBC, and NBC Universal.

As such, Adobe will also today demonstrate Flash Player 10 running on the Symbian-powered Nokia 360, Android, and Windows Mobile smart phones featuring WebKit, Chrome, and Internet Explorer respectively.

Anup Murarka, Adobe’s director of technology strategy and partner development, told The Reg that Adobe expects the Flash 10 plug-in for the three browsers to be ready by the end of this year. He added there are also "a number of other players who are anxious to see it and do the engineering on their platforms as well".

It’s not clear if this includes Apple, which has rejected Flash on the iPhone and in the iPhone’s Safari browser. Adobe has said that it is collaborating with Apple on this.

Adobe also today plans to release a reworked version of PDF for mobile devices to make it more suited to reading books and online content on readers and smart phones. Adobe Reader Mobile will let you zoom in and pan around pages, and pages will dynamically re-size to fit the size of the screen - making it more like AIR as used by the New York Times' reader.

Adobe Reader Mobile also supports emerging publishing formats and replaces Adobe Reader LE. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.