Feeds

Intel 'accelerates' 32nm chip launch

Keeping up with the meres and the dales

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Intel is feeling pretty confident about the ramp of its 32nm processors, set for production in late 2009. In fact, the company says it's "accelerating" the process shrink by skipping 45nm chips that were going to arrive later this year.

The upcoming Westmere launch will "de-emphasise*" 45nm Auburndale chips that Intel planned on letting co-exist with its new 32nm line in 2009. Instead, those Auburndale wafers will be used to increase production of Westmere desktop and notebook chips. Intel detailed its revised roadmap at a press event in San Francisco today.

Westmere mobile and desktop chips are still on schedule for production in the fourth quarter of 2009. But Intel wouldn't comment on when OEMs could be expected to introduce products using the chips.

The initial ramp will focus on the mainstream market, rather than chips for high-end PCs and servers. Intel said it decided on its volume ramp platforms well ahead of time. So, according to the company, it's just a happy coincidence that there's a lot more focus on getting cheaper kit during this recession year.

Westmere will launch with two cores and four threads for mainstream desktops and the mobile market. The desktop chip is code-named 'Clarkdale' and the mobile chip, 'Arrandale.'

Intel said both Clarkdale and Arrandale offerings in 2009 will have clock speeds at a similar range to what the company has today. But what will give them a boost in performance is hyperthreading and an ability to switch between on-die graphics and discrete graphics. This is the first Intel chip to offer switchable on-die/discrete graphics. The on-die graphics will host a 2-channel DDR3 memory controller.

Westmere will scale to a six-core/12-thread processor called 'Gulftown' later in 2010.

According to the company's roadmap, it doesn't plan on having a 32nm chip in production without integrated graphics this year. The graphics core inside Westmere will be 45nm tech.

Westmere processors also include Intel's new AES instruction set, which Intel said will be a similar upgrade to adding SSE4.1 in 45nm Penryn chips.

The CPUs will be compatible with Intel's 5-series chipsets.

Intel said it will be baking Westmere chips at its D1D fab in Oregon, followed by the D1C fab in Oregon in the fourth quarter. Production will also begin at Intel's fabs in Arizona and New Mexico in 2010. ®

*nicer to say than "kill" because nobody admits they were wrong.

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Chumps stump up $1 MEELLLION for watch that doesn't exist
By the way, I have a really nice bridge you might like...
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.