Feeds

China preps internet porn snitching awards

Ceiling cat wants the washer/dryer set

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

China's crackdown on internet pornography and "lewd" content on the web has claimed another 276 websites, the government said on Tuesday, bringing the total number of websites closed to 1,911.

Although officials say they've made "notable progress" in cleansing the internet of smut and pesky dissenting political voices behind its Great Firewall, an unnamed official told the Xinhua new service — believe it or not — some folks are still finding ways of getting around the anti-porn regime.

The official stated that many sites have sidestepped government warnings by changing the offending website's URL or simply the page's appearance.

That's partially why People's Republic authorities are developing a scheme to get the public involved in snitching on internet smut peddlers. Under the program, those who report online porn to regulators would be given unspecified "rewards."

China's nationwide campaign launched earlier this year against websites, video games, mobile text messages, and other forms of digital communication fingered for "violating public morality and harming the physical and mental health of youth and young people."

Of course, covered under the definition of "lewd" is media containing violence, libel, or material that violates the government's standards of public decency. That has many worried the porn side of the purge is a distraction from a cracking down on online political dissent.

Xinhua reported late January that 41 people have been detained in the push for "promulgating porn online."

Even major sites like Google China and Baidu have been pressured to publicly apologize for being too slow to remove links to pornographic materials.

Not everyone's a critic of the porn crackdown. United Nations delegates held their periodic human rights progress panel for China on Monday, where Iran's Farhad Mamdouhi highlighted the "negative effects" of the internet and said China should continue its efforts to combat online porn. ®

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

More from The Register

next story
Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them
It's almost as though pr0n was actually rather popular
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup
Just hook us up to more 10Gbps ports, backbone biz yells in tit-for-tat spat
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.