Feeds

Anonymous digs ahead of more assaults on Scientology

'Time to finish what was started'

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

The Anonymous collective is moving on from the first anniversary of its protests against the Church of Scientology with a round of further demonstrations.

The next round of global protests will span several weekends. Anonymous claims its campaign has scored a number of successes over the last 12 months, since indignation at attempts to censor the infamous Tom Cruise Scientology ward ceremony video touched off the first round of protests against the church in January 2008, which initially involved online protests, nuisance calls and controversial attempts to blitz Scientology websites. February 2008 marked the start of a ongoing series of monthly protests outside Scientology offices and centres across the world.

The loosely-affiliated group aims to dismantle the Church of Scientology in its current form by exposing what it claims are the "corrupt and abusive practices" of organised Scientology through Project Chanology.

According to Anonymous, the campaign has led to leaks of internal documents and policies about the church. Protests on the streets have emboldened media organisation prompting, for example, Australian TV to screen Scientology lectures that show how adherents are told that all life’s anxieties and worries are "caused by the infestation of dead alien souls". Upcoming lawsuits (examples here and here) will further expose the "scams and scandals" of the Church of Scientology.

The upcoming release of John Duignan’s book The Complex: An Insider Exposes the Covert World of the Church of Scientology, which is legally blocked from sale in the UK, will "serve to raise awareness about Scientology in the UK, as well as any country whose citizens heard about this censorship".

In a statement, Anonymous said: "Scientology operatives still continue to paint Anonymous in a negative light as a means of distracting attention from Scientology operations and attempting to discredit those who bring truth to the issues at hand. It just isn’t working.

"It has been some 12 months – time to finish what was started," it adds. ®

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
UK government officially adopts Open Document Format
Microsoft insurgency fails, earns snarky remark from UK digital services head
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.