Feeds

Anonymous digs ahead of more assaults on Scientology

'Time to finish what was started'

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The Anonymous collective is moving on from the first anniversary of its protests against the Church of Scientology with a round of further demonstrations.

The next round of global protests will span several weekends. Anonymous claims its campaign has scored a number of successes over the last 12 months, since indignation at attempts to censor the infamous Tom Cruise Scientology ward ceremony video touched off the first round of protests against the church in January 2008, which initially involved online protests, nuisance calls and controversial attempts to blitz Scientology websites. February 2008 marked the start of a ongoing series of monthly protests outside Scientology offices and centres across the world.

The loosely-affiliated group aims to dismantle the Church of Scientology in its current form by exposing what it claims are the "corrupt and abusive practices" of organised Scientology through Project Chanology.

According to Anonymous, the campaign has led to leaks of internal documents and policies about the church. Protests on the streets have emboldened media organisation prompting, for example, Australian TV to screen Scientology lectures that show how adherents are told that all life’s anxieties and worries are "caused by the infestation of dead alien souls". Upcoming lawsuits (examples here and here) will further expose the "scams and scandals" of the Church of Scientology.

The upcoming release of John Duignan’s book The Complex: An Insider Exposes the Covert World of the Church of Scientology, which is legally blocked from sale in the UK, will "serve to raise awareness about Scientology in the UK, as well as any country whose citizens heard about this censorship".

In a statement, Anonymous said: "Scientology operatives still continue to paint Anonymous in a negative light as a means of distracting attention from Scientology operations and attempting to discredit those who bring truth to the issues at hand. It just isn’t working.

"It has been some 12 months – time to finish what was started," it adds. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Why Oracle CEO Larry Ellison had to go ... Except he hasn't
Silicon Valley's veteran seadog in piratical Putin impression
Big Content Australia just blew a big hole in its credibility
AHEDA's research on average content prices did not expose methodology, so appears less than rigourous
Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed
Remastered so hard it would be difficult or impossible to master it again
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.