Feeds

Gears of War grind to halt

Expired digital cert kills PC play

Security for virtualized datacentres

A digital certificate that expired Wednesday ground Gears of War to a halt last week, leaving many unable to launch the original PC-version of the first person shooter until Epic Games works out a fix.

The online cheat detection used in Gears relies on a Windows digital certificate that expired January 28, 2009. Gamers attempting to launch Gears since Wednesday have been blocked with an error saying the game can't run "with modified executable code."

"Well, we made an embarrassing mistake: we signed the executable with a certificate that expired in a way that broke the game," said an Epic Games spokesperson posting on the official Gears forum.

"We're working with Microsoft to re-sign the binaries properly, and hope to have this fixed very soon. We know how much this situation sucks, and we apologize for the inconvenience."

In the mean time, gamers can work-around the problem by setting the computer's clock to a date before January 28. Of course, that's far from an ideal solution.

As of this publication Monday, Epic still hasn't released a patch fixing the error.

We should note that the spokesman made a point of claiming the error is not related to DRM, but the term still has been thrown around quite a bit for the screwup. This seems to be more of an argument about semantics. It is in fact code that breaks an application based on unauthorized use. On the other hand, the lockout is local and doesn't phone home to an Epic Games server.

Tough call; we'll just call it really $*@%ing annoying. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.