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Experian sends 'cheap' Lord a-leaping

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Credit rating agency Experian has split from Lord Taylor of Blackburn, one of its political advisers, after the ermine-clad idiot said he could get legislation changed for cash.

Police are investigating allegations against four peers - Lord Moonie, Lord Truscott, Lord Taylor of Blackburn and Lord Snape - that they offered journalists improper help in exchange for payment. All were caught in a Sunday Times sting.

The Register of Lords' Interests saw several changes this week. Taylor's affiliation with Experian was removed as was his work for Initial Electronic Security Systems. But Taylor is now an adviser to Gersphere UK Limited and a Deutsche Telekom subsidiary T-Systems Limited, along with five other companies.

A spokesman for Experian said: "We were surprised by the descriptions given by Lord Taylor about what he did for us. In the circumstances, we have agreed that Lord Taylor will retire with immediate effect.

"The full extent of Lord Taylor's role as consultant was limited to providing us with general advisory and introductory activities, which he declared as an interest. His role was to keep us appraised on developments which may be of interest to our industry and provide basic advice on the appropriate people our team ought to speak to."

Taylor is heard on tape released by the paper referring to Experian and claiming he amended and delayed a piece of legislation to which the agency objected. He said he was paid up to £100,000 a year by some companies and "was cheap at the price".

A House of Lords committee is investigating the allegations which are also being probed by four Metropolitan Police officers. ®

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