Feeds

Aperi dies on its arse

Time-wasting diversion keels over

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Like Monty Python's famous dead parrot, the futile Aperi open source storage system management project has fluttered to earth because IBM has removed the funding nail that was keeping it upright. Aperi is now openly dead for all the world to see.

The whole idea has been a waste of time and effort from start to finish. IBM led a group including Brocade, CA, Cisco, Emulex, Fujitsu, LSI Logic, NetApp and Sun, which set up Aperi in October 2005. The setting up effectively rejected HP and EMC from the group. HP had bought the SMI-S-compliant AppIQ storage management company earlier in September that year, SMI-S being the SNIA's (Storage Networking Industry Association) storage system management standard initiative, widely held then as now to be inneffective.

It was suspected that IBM set up the Aperi group as a response to this.

NetApp's CTO, Jay Kidd, has separated storage system management into view APIs and control APIs. A view API is an interface for a system management product to look at an EMC, an HP or other storage product and find out what is going on. A control API is the means whereby it can tell the storage product to do something and its these control APIs that tend to be regarded as proprietary property and kept close to suppliers' chests. SMI-S has ineffective control API support from vendors.

As an example of this, read storage practitioner Chris Evans' blog entry on the topic.

Aperi was set up to remedy some SMI-S ills and also, fairly obviously, as a competitive marketing weapon to beat EMC and HP with. However, as IBM knew - it's blindingly obvious - you can't have a storage standard if lots of the main players don't support it, and if the ones that do aren't serious about funding it.

So Aperi set out on its blundering path to the storage cemetery. Symantec refused to join in, saying Aperi wasn't properly aligned to the SNIA's SMI-S product. The SNIA, of course, being an industry body, couldn't tell half its members to stop an effort that was going to divide the storage management area and be a self-defeating effort. It was hard enough getting SMI-S off the ground without these other SNIA members trying to fly their own alternate kite.

In June 2006 Sun abruptly left Aperi and offered its support to the primacy of the SNIA and its SMI-S project. IBM offloaded Aperi onto the Eclipse Foundation and said Aperi would have a formal relationship with the SNIA. Novell also joined the Aperi 'community' then.

IBM said at the time: "This is the latest step in Aperi's efforts to give customers more choices for deploying open storage infrastructure software - based on an industry-standard platform developed by the open source community... IBM plans to contribute more than one million lines of code from its TotalStorage Productivity Center software to the proposed Eclipse project." Wow.

As for the SNIA, IBM said: "While SMI-S is the open standard specification that SNIA members support and drive, Aperi is the open source implementation of that standard. By providing a tested implementation of SMI-S, which standardizes storage management technologies for storage hardware interfaces, Aperi will drive greater industry support and wider adoption of SMI-S." Noble words - but they turned out to be meaningless.

June 2007 came around and the initial Aperi code was ready to download for testing a development. But nobody wanted it.

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
'Kim Kardashian snaps naked selfies with a BLACKBERRY'. *Twitterati gasps*
More alleged private, nude celeb pics appear online
Wanna keep your data for 1,000 YEARS? No? Hard luck, HDS wants you to anyway
Combine Blu-ray and M-DISC and you get this monster
US boffins demo 'twisted radio' mux
OAM takes wireless signals to 32 Gbps
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
EMC, HP blockbuster 'merger' shocker comes a cropper
Stand down, FTC... you can put your feet up for a bit
Apple flops out 2FA for iCloud in bid to stop future nude selfie leaks
Millions of 4chan users howl with laughter as Cupertino slams stable door
Students playing with impressive racks? Yes, it's cluster comp time
The most comprehensive coverage the world has ever seen. Ever
Run little spreadsheet, run! IBM's Watson is coming to gobble you up
Big Blue's big super's big appetite for big data in big clouds for big analytics
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.