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Rogue contractor admits Oz gov hack attacks

Cracking spree followed 'brain snap'

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An Australian has admitted causing AUS$1m in damage after hacking into the computer systems of the Northern Territory Government and deleting records of thousands of civil servants.

Anthony McIntosh, 28, a computer engineer pleaded guilty to 12 computer hacking offences at a hearing before the Northern Territory in Darwin on Monday. The court heard how McIntosh worked as a computer contractor employed by CSG Service and working on the government systems, before leaving under a cloud in April 2008.

A month later he hacked into systems including the Health Department, Royal Darwin Hospital, Berrimah Prison and the Supreme Court. He also deleted the profile of 10,475 public servants from the systems, The Australian reports. His actions left systems inoperable.

McIntosh used a former colleague's password and a housemate's laptop to carry out the attack. The ploy failed miserably and he was quickly arrested and charged. McIntosh's lawyers asked for a psychological assessment prior to a future sentencing hearing claiming their client had "a brain snap," ABC adds. ®

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