Feeds

Programmers take to the clouds

Sure beats trolling the financial sites

A new approach to endpoint data protection

The analysts at market researcher Evans Data, which spends its days obsessing about what programmers are up to, have released their Open Source Software/Linux Development 2008 report. The data compiled in the report is based on 360 interviews that the company did with software developers, and despite all the hype about cloud computing, a fairly significant number of open source developers say they plan to deploy their applications as Web services on one of several cloud computing providers.

Maybe they were just putting the pollers on? The people of Samoa kept a straight face when telling boldface lies about their lifestyle to anthropologist Margaret Mead, so there is some precedent of a people spontaneously getting their story straight for the sake of a good laugh. (There are many others, such as mortgage-backed securities. But let's not go there.)

According to the polls from Evans Data, 40 per cent of developers who are working on open source applications say they will put them on a cloud infrastructure of some sort. Google's App Engine, which allows Python applications to be deployed on Google's Web server iron and hit Google's own BigTable data storage, was the chosen platform by 28 per cent of those developers.

Amazon's Web Services, which includes the EC2 compute utility, the S3 storage utility, and a bunch of other stuff, was cited by 15 per cent. Developers also cited clouds from Microsoft (Azure, still in beta), Salesforce.com (AppExchange), and IBM (Blue Cloud) as platforms they were looking to deploy their applications too.

"As costs increase for power, staff, and data center resources, more businesses are being attracted to the latest promise: moving more of the company's infrastructure and applications into a third-party provided cloud," explained John Andrews, president and chief executive at Evans Data in a statement flogging the report. "Many companies are using this model to not only reduce infrastructure costs, but [to] simultaneously increase their computational capabilities."

To help sell the study, er, enlighten us some more, Evans Data sprinkled a few more nuggets of data on the announcement.

Some 52 per cent of developers polled in November said they use a virtualized instance of Linux (presumably, this was meant for development and test, not production environments). Just a little more than half of the developers also said they use the MySQL database, controlled by Sun Microsystems but still open source, in some of their projects, and two-thirds report that they use a SQL relational database of one kind or another (and either open or closed source) as the backend of their applications.

One in five programmers also reported that they use the Flex programming language, which is a Web 2.0-style language that occupies the same niche as JavaFX, AJAX, and Silverlight, among others. ®

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

More from The Register

next story
PEAK LANDFILL: Why tablet gloom is good news for Windows users
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Fiendishly complex password app extension ships for iOS 8
Just slip it in, won't hurt a bit, 1Password makers urge devs
Mozilla keeps its Beard, hopes anti-gay marriage troubles are now over
Plenty on new CEO's todo list – starting with Firefox's slipping grasp
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
Another day, another Firefox: Version 31 is upon us ALREADY
Web devs, Mozilla really wants you to like this one
Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
Cloudy CoreOS Linux distro declares itself production-ready
Lightweight, container-happy Linux gets first Stable release
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?