Feeds

Open-sourcers get with the git

Sucking from the teat of Linus

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

There was a time when the Linux community used BitKeeper as its source code control system, after switching from the open-source CVS. But then Samba developer Andrew Tridgell figured out you could telnet to a BitKeeper server, type "HELP," and get a list of commands. Upon hearing of Tridgell's daring hack, BitMover - the company that maintains BitKeeper - got all license-revokey on the community, changing the terms of the agreement and demanding that Linux developers start paying for its software.

There were other free source control systems available, and the popular one was Subversion, which was billed by its creators as "CVS done right." If you've never used CVS, the dark humor in that statement is that it doesn't make sense. Labeling something "CVS done right" is about the same as labeling something "a urinary tract infection done right.” Many developers, Linus included, find CVS and the like completely unacceptable.

Now, the Legend of Linus is part truth and part mythology. Nobody really knows where the facts end and the tall stories begin. But one common theme in all of them is that Linus has the power of many men. While that multiple is up for debate, the editorial staff here at The Reg has decreed that Linus has the power of ten. It's a conservative estimate, but it keeps our fact checkers happy.

With the power of ten men, Linus reacted swiftly. Rather than cry about it like a little bitch, he created his own source control system called git. In a self-deprecating style that only a developer on Linus's level could pull off, Linus said, "I'm an egotistical bastard, and I name all my projects after myself. First Linux, now git.”

(We Americans don't really get the joke, because while “git” is British slang for a worthless person, we have come to acknowledge the fundamental law of British insults: don't be insulting).

Git, which works very differently from other source control systems like CVS and Subversion, took the freetard world by storm when it came out. Many enterprise developers just saw git's popularity as open source programmers suckling from the teat of Linus, but it kept growing. Programmers started to use git for their side projects and got hooked.

Git is gaining traction because given all other source control systems out there, git is the superior technology. One of the most compelling features is the cheap, local branching. With git, it's very easy to branch your entire codebase, try out some new feature or development path, and either merge it to the main branch or cast it aside like an unwanted child.

Plus, since git doesn't need to run from a central server, nobody will be able to look at your branch commit logs and see the atrocities you've committed. It's only when you're sure your code is ready for public consumption do you push your local repository to the remote one, so that other developers can admire the code you've written.

Developers will almost always select the best technology, and management must be dragged along kicking and screaming. It's no surprise that while git is making some headway in the enterprise, sometimes it's very under-the-radar and slow going.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
Sway: Microsoft's new Office app doesn't have an Undo function
Content aggregation, meet the workplace ... oh
Sign off my IT project or I’ll PHONE your MUM
Honestly, it’s a piece of piss
Return of the Jedi – Apache reclaims web server crown
.london, .hamburg and .公司 - that's .com in Chinese - storm the web server charts
NetWare sales revive in China thanks to that man Snowden
If it ain't Microsoft, it's in fashion behind the Great Firewall
Chrome 38's new HTML tag support makes fatties FIT and SKINNIER
First browser to protect networks' bandwith using official spec
Admins! Never mind POODLE, there're NEW OpenSSL bugs to splat
Four new patches for open-source crypto libraries
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.