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Google G1 successor spied in video?

Fans anticipate G2 launch

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A video demonstration of a handset thought to be the G1 Googlephone’s successor has been leaked online.

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The seven-minute film opens with a shot of the phone’s front, which clearly shows the name “Dream”. The G1 was developed by HTC, and Dream is thought to have been the firm’s codename for it, so what we could be looking at here is the G2. Or it could be a G1 prototype.

The video shows the phone running Google’s Android OS and a Google logo printed onto the battery cover, a feature shared with the G1.

After these initial shots, you’re treated to a step-by-step guide through all of the phone’s features. These range from taking pictures and watching videos, to playing games and accessing the web.

Google’s green Android character has also been put to use as a comical phone charger. Although the phone seems real enough, it’s strange that a stylus has been added for data input when Google’s keen to get users hooked on fingertip data-entry.

Since the video carries no official recognition, it’s impossible to say if the phone will make it to the UK. ®

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