Feeds

Nokia adopts LGPL for Qt popularity

The way to a developer's heart

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Nokia will release the next major version of Qt under a fourth license - LGLP - in its mission to drive uptake of the cross-platform interface framework.

The mobile phone giant is expected today to announce that Qt 4.5, due in March, will be released under Lesser GNU Public License 2.1 in addition to the General Public License (GPL) - versions two and three - and a commercial license.

The idea is to woo partners by offering what it considers a commercial friendly (but non-company specific) license in the wake of Nokia's acquisition of Qt author Trolltech last year.

Sebastian Nystrom, Nokia's vice president of Qt software, told The Reg that Qt 4.5 is the first major release of Qt since that acquisition. The cross-platform toolkit and framework for building interfaces and devices will see improved support for the WebKit open-source project for improved HTML and JavaScript performance in the browser.

He said version 4.5 represented a "good time" to start accelerating uptake of Qt.

Nystrom said the LGPL would appeal to companies that want to build using Qt and to release code using an open-source model without having to subscribe to GPL, while also avoiding becoming tied into a single company through the terms of Qt's commercial license.

According to Nystrom, the open-source model would let companies working with Qt benefit from community bug fixes and patches in specific industrial sectors, whether it's a desktop or a mobile device. This will let companies bring Qt-based mobile and desktop products to market faster than they could otherwise manage, he reckoned.

"All the feature complexity of the bigger development and UI framework like Qt get sorted out so the functionality comes quicker to the product," Nystrom said.

Why's Nokia being so benevolent?

Qt is a popular development framework and development kit that Nokia's trying to establish further. Nokia wants to establish Qt as a framework that spans desktop and mobile application development, while also making it easier to write applications for different mobile devices using a single development framework and code base.

Qt already supports Linux, Windows and OS X on the desktop, and OpenMoko's ASU and Nokia's Maemo, used on Nokia Internet Tablet, on mobile. Qt is used in the KDE desktop environment, the Opera browser, Google Earth, Skype, and Adobe Systems' Photoshop Album.

Nokia, though, needs greater buy-in to the Nokia ecosystem of mobile devices and would no doubt like to tap the trend for rich internet applications (RIAs) running unaltered on desktop systems and mobile devices. That's something Adobe Systems is working on using AIR and through the Open Screen Project, and that Microsoft has expressed an interest in - but yet to deliver on - with its Silverlight browser-based media player.

Late last year, Nokia released a developer preview of Qt for its S60 Symbian-based device. Qt for S60 will be available in the second quarter of this year.

Symbian growth, though, has been slowing while developers have become fascinated by the iPhone and Linux on mobile. Nokia last year announced it's open sourcing Symbian, having bought out other partners in the Symbian consortium to take control over its direction

With that in mind, the decision to introduce another to Qt license - a license Nokia believes confers freedom on potential commercial partners and should ease concerns over single-vendor tie in - should be seen as something Nokia believes will bring more software partners to Qt and to the Nokia ecosystem.

Those partners can come either by building for the Symbian S60, Qt in general, or building applications that span mobile devices and desktop machines. ®

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Captain Kirk sets phaser to SLAUGHTER after trying new Facebook app
William Shatner less-than-impressed by Zuck's celebrity-only app
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.