Feeds

Oracle trims sales, marketing, and back office staff?

Profits first

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Oracle has apparently joined the ranks of tech vendors cutting staff but is still - relatively speaking - sitting pretty.

The world's largest supplier of databases has reportedly cut between three and four per cent of its sales and marketing "expense" and two per cent of general and administrative expenses.

As of May 2008 - when Oracle released its last 10k statement on the subject - head count totaled 84,233 full-time staff, with 19,465 in sales and marketing and 8,304 running the back office. That could mean 778 from sales and marketing and 166 from the back-office team are getting chopped.

Oracle declined to comment.

If the report is true, the cuts seem geared towards helping maintain Oracle's profitability, according to Thomas Weisel Partners analyst Tim Klasell who announced the losses. The analyst wrote the move was "well planned and not a hasty reaction to an unplanned event."

The cuts follow a second-quarter that - while inline with estimates - saw business from sales of new copies of Oracle software fall three per cent. That quarter was reported on December 18.

They also follow three years' of rampant corporate and technology acquisition, which has seen Oracle's head count double. Full-time staff numbered 41,658 in 2004 - the year before Oracle's M&A juggernaut started rolling, with a series of deals that saw PeopleSoft, BEA Systems, Siebel, and a host of others succumb.

During that time, the number of back-office staff has doubled - from 4,705 to 8,304. The company, though, has kept an extremely tight rein on sales and marketing: numbers have gone in the opposite direction - down to 19,465 last year from 24,760 four years ago.

Oracle is famed for having employees re-interview for positions and for cutting lose "underperformers", so these latest cuts could be considered part of the process.

Also, for some perspective, Oracle's cuts are minor in terms of sheer numbers and proportion of workforce compared to some. Erstwhile partner Sun Microsystems is cutting 6,000, almost a fifth of its employees, tools rival Borland Software is cutting 15 per cent, and database competitor IBM is reported to be sharpening the axe on 16,000, or four per cent. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.