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UFO damages Lincolnshire wind turbine

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Lincolnshire ufologists are combing the area around the Conisholme wind farm for evidence to back their theory that one of the turbines was on Sunday seriously damaged by a "mystery aircraft", as the BBC euphemistically puts it.

The turbine - one of 20 operated at the site by Ecotricity - lost one 66ft (20m) blade and suffered damage to another in the incident following "many reports of activity in the area" received by the aforementioned friends of ET.

Russ Kellett of the Flying Saucer Bureau confirmed: "One saw what they at first thought was a low-flying aircraft on the Saturday evening and another heard a loud banging in the early hours of Sunday."

"This is the second most reports of activity we have ever had - I have had over 30 phone calls and emails. To hit two of the blades, any object must have been about 170ft long."

Ecotricity described the extent of the damage as "unique". Company founder Dale Vince said: "We don't have an explanation at the moment as to what the cause was. We have been crawling all over it and have sent bits off for analysis to see if we can work out what caused it. Until we have some idea, some plausible explanation that it was not a UFO, I don't think we should rule it out."

Vince insisted that "to make one of these blades fall off, or to bend it, takes a lot" - something which is not strictly technically correct, since a simple brake failure will certainly do the trick, as the Danes can attest:

To its immense credit, the Ministry of Defence is having none of the Lincolnshire UFO turbine prang shocker. A spokesman dismissed the matter, saying: "The MoD examines reports solely to establish whether UK airspace may have been compromised by hostile or unauthorised military activity. Unless there's evidence of a potential threat, there's no attempt to identify the nature of each sighting reported." ®

Bootnote

The BBC has a video report into the incident here.

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