Feeds

Intel accused of stealing chip virtualization, violating God's law

Prison inmate sues Chipzilla for $5bn

Top three mobile application threats

An American prison inmate has sued Intel for $5 billion, insisting the chip maker's Core 2 Duo chip and its virtualization technology are based on trade secrets pilfered from him by way of Apple supremo Steve Jobs.

In court papers recently filed with an Oregon-based US District Court, 43-year-old Matthew Robert Young claims that he shared these trade secrets with His Steveness in 2003 and that Jobs quickly spilled the beans to the world's largest chip maker.

Young - currently a prisoner at the Snake River Correctional Institution in Ontario, Oregon - demands a jury trial and an "extrodinary hearing" [sic], where he will prove by "factual demonstration" that he is "the only person in the world at present who knows how to make both the Core-2 Duo micro processor and [its] Virtual Technology work."

In March or April of 2003, court papers say, Young sent Steve Jobs designs and schematics for a "Hacker proof, Virus proof Computer with Multiphase Microprocessors" that he liked to call Lancelot. He was hoping Jobs would help develop and market the designs - or buy them outright for $250 million.

Apparently, Jobs never replied. But later that year, according to the filing, the Apple cult leader shared Young's plans with Chipzilla. "The exact nature and extent of the Agreement between Mr. Jobs, and Intel Corporation is not known," the filing reads. "It remains however a fact that Mr. Steve Jobs, Defrauded Intel Corporation, by not totally Disclosing to, and Informing Intel Corporation just where exactly he got it, and from whom he actually did get the Designs and Schematics for the Dual-Core/ Core-2 Duo Microprocessor, and Virtual Technology."

In June 2006, the filing continues, Intel senior veep Pat Gelsinger appeared in The Oregonian holding a motherboard, and Young says he can prove this motherboard was manufactured from his stolen intellectual property.

After learning that Intel made an awful lot of money from microchips in 2006, Young says, he sent his Lancelot designs to Gelsinger and company - along with the following missive:

Dear Intel Corporation:

Does this look familiar? Well it should. It is the Hacker Proof, Virus Proof Computer, that I invented, which I Call [LANCELOT]. I showed it to Steve Jobs, at Apple Computer, and asked him for Two Hundred and Fifty Million Dollars, he took it to you at Intel, and you built it but you do not know how to turn it on.

So here is what you are going to do. You are going to Agree to pay me Seventy Percent (70 %) every thing that You Gross Profit, and then I will tell you how to turn It on and make it do what I Designed it to do.

You have 30 days to Respond, on Bonded paper, with your Signature written in Blue ink, or I am going to send copies Of my schematics to AMD (Advance Micro Devices) and Tell them how it works for next to nothing.

Young says Intel "responded exactly in the manner [he] DEMANDED... meeting the required conditions, and obligations placed." As proof, he supplies a letter printed on bonded paper and signed by an Intel employee:

We have received the materials you provided to us in connection with the above referenced matter. After consideration and review of the submitted documents, Intel has determined not to pursue this matter.

Thank you for your interest in Intel Corporation and for bringing this opportunity to our attention.

Young acknowledges, however, that Intel did not agree to that 70 per cent profit cut. But he points out that with its letter - and later correspondence - the company never denied that or even challenged that he was the original creator of the company's dual core processor.

And so, with his court filing, Matthew Robert Young "prays that the United States District Court will Issue a Judgment Awarding" him $5 billion. Yes, $5 billion - the same sum Dylan Stephen Jayne demanded from Google for "crimes against humanity."

To prove Intel's liability, Young cites Romans Chapter 3, verses 19 and 20 of "the supreme law of the LORD GOD OF HOST":

v. 19 Now we know that what things so ever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law: that every mouth may be stopped and all the world may become guilty before God.

v. 20 Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in His sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin.

"So it follows," Young says, "that liability is upon to those who are under the Law and who have knowledge of it." ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Kingston DataTraveler MicroDuo: Turn your phone into a 72GB beast
USB-usiness in the front, micro-USB party in the back
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
BOFH: Oh DO tell us what you think. *CLICK*
$%%&amp Oh dear, we've been cut *CLICK* Well hello *CLICK* You're breaking up...
Just what could be inside Dropbox's new 'Home For Life'?
Biz apps, messaging, photos, email, more storage – sorry, did you think there would be cake?
IT bods: How long does it take YOU to train up on new tech?
I'll leave my arrays to do the hard work, if you don't mind
Amazon reveals its Google-killing 'R3' server instances
A mega-memory instance that never forgets
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.