Feeds

Sun offers free GlassFish education

Repeats download model

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

The secret to business according to Sun Microsystems' chief executive Jonathan Schwartz is to first build volume and then figure out how to make money from the audience you've created.

That's what he told a small audience attending last November's long-awaited JavaFX launch, and it's the mantra driving Sun's software strategy for the last few years.

Now that thinking has found its way into training and services - hitherto one area where becalmed software companies could at least hope to make some easy money.

Sun is offering free training for people who go the extra mile once they've downloaded their copy of Sun's free, open-source GlassFish Java application server and register the product.

GlassFish training

Roll-up, roll-up - or not: free GlassFish training

Free training covers designing Java web services, adding quality of services and .NET interoperability, and building transactional web services. You've got until March 20 to also get a quarter off of Sun's GlassFish Administration Bundle, a nine-hour course priced at $820.

Sun has claimed millions of GlassFish downloads. If Sun is to be believed, these downloads have not translated into a market that Sun's been monetizing judging by its numbers. From a product-licensing perspective, companies are not paying Sun.

That's seen Sun try to tempt them out with an all-you-can eat model of licensing: you can, for example, get GlassFish Enterprise Unlimited starting at $25,000 for an unlimited number of instances.

When it comes to training and support, the free offer is intended to make all those unregistered consumers of GlassFish turn to Sun for their education.

Traditionally, training and support for enterprise products such as application servers has provided a decent and reasonably predictable source of revenue for enterprise software companies. That's particularly been the case when growth from actual sales of products has stalled.

Such training should prove particularly important for a modular platform like GlassFish, which is - theoretically - infinitely configurable and, therefore, infinitely confusing to the user.

If people aren't taking advantage of the all-you-can eat licensing model, though, then it seems they will also be unwilling to adopt free training. First off: why get trained in a product you and no one else is using? And secondly: Sun is coming against the great problem inherent in open-source that others have also struck: people will Google and support themselves first before - finally - deciding to fork out any money and pay their vendor. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
The Heartbleed Bug: how to protect your business with Symantec
What happens when the next Heartbleed (or worse) comes along, and what can you do to weather another chapter in an all-too-familiar string of debilitating attacks?
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.