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Sony Ericsson Cyber-shot C905 eight-megapixel cameraphone

Sony's best cameraphone yet

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Review With Sony Ericsson’s Cyber-shot cameraphone pedigree, it’s no surprise that the firm's been swift to join the ranks of eight-megapixel mobile makers. Its new flagship, the C905, not only ups the pixel count but it's comfortably the most feature-laden Cyber-shot yet.

Sony Ericsson Cyber-shot C905

Sony Ericsson's Cyber-shot C905: digicam styling

Unlike the first wave of eight-megapixel hot shots, including the LG Renoir, Samsung Pixon and Samsung i8510, the C905 sliderphone doesn’t have touchscreen control or smartphone functionality, but it does work its Cyber-shot credentials hard.

This HSDPA-enabled 3G phone certainly doesn’t vie with the slimline Renoir and Pixon to be the leanest eight-megapixel cameraphone in town. It’s a decidedly chunky handful, packing it in at 104 x 49 x 18-19.5mm, and weighing a pocket-sagging 136g – a distinct contrast to its svelte C902 five-megapixel stablemate. And that’s without any fancy optical zoom to bulk it out.

The flip side of the stocky build is that it gives a solid, weighty feeling in the hand, which makes it well-balanced and stable for taking pictures when held on its side. The mix of rubberized plastic and brushed metal on the back and sides looks and feels high quality, and gives a sound grip for camerawork.

The lens and xenon flash on the back is protected by a classy-looking sliding rectangular metal cover. As well as looking after the optics, slipping it down activates the camera. Nicely, this happens even when the keypad lock is on.

Sony Ericsson Cyber-shot C905

Snap happy

Protective scratch-resistant glass on the front panel protects the display too. It’s a 2.4in, 240 x 320, 262,144-colour display - bigger than we normally see on Sony Ericsson phones, but not huge compared to the touchscreen cameraphones like the Renoir (3in) and Pixon (3.2in). Still, it’s decent enough for a clear and bright viewfinder screen, and fine for general phone usage. A built-in accelerometer automatically flips the screen between portrait and landscape mode in certain functions, depending on how the device is being held.

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