Feeds

MS (finally) confirms unpatched SQL Server flaw

Exploit code for 0day fails to ping on Redmond's radar

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Microsoft came clean and admitted its SQL Server database software is vulnerable to code injection attacks. It's not a new flaw but the same bug in the database software that emerged around the time of Microsoft's monthly Patch Tuesday update earlier this month.

In an advisory, Redmond's security gnomes confirmed that code has been produced that exploits a security bug affecting Microsoft SQL Server 2000, Microsoft SQL Server 2005 and Windows Internal Database, in certain configurations.

On the plus side, Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 4, Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 3, and Microsoft SQL Server 2008 are immune from the flaw. Third party apps that make use of the vulnerable code also appear to be in the clear.

The software giant stated that although exploit code exists it hasn't received any reports of attacks. Its advisory contains suggested workarounds.

Microsoft fails to mention this but Secunia reports that the flaw is the same bug discovered by SEC Consulting, which published an advisory on the security bug on 4 December. SEC Consulting only did this after months of dialogue with Microsoft.

A separate zero-day vulnerability became the subject of an out-of-sequence patch. That flaw is being hit far harder than the SQL server bug, which arguably presents a lower general risk for internet hygiene. Microsoft said it's investigating the SQL Server flaw, which past form would suggest is a candidate for a patch in either January or February as part of Microsoft's regular Patch Tuesday update cycle.

Security flaws in SQL Server are of interest well outside the data centre.

Hackers often use vulnerabilities in database software to plant malicious script that hijack internet sessions to serve up exploit code from systems under their control. The tactic forms the basis of drive-by download attacks, a class of assault that's become a preferred distribution route for Trojan code over recent years.®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Rupert Murdoch says Google is worse than the NSA
Mr Burns vs. The Chocolate Factory, round three!
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Know what Ferguson city needs right now? It's not Anonymous doxing random people
U-turn on vow to identify killer cop after fingering wrong bloke
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.