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MS (finally) confirms unpatched SQL Server flaw

Exploit code for 0day fails to ping on Redmond's radar

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Microsoft came clean and admitted its SQL Server database software is vulnerable to code injection attacks. It's not a new flaw but the same bug in the database software that emerged around the time of Microsoft's monthly Patch Tuesday update earlier this month.

In an advisory, Redmond's security gnomes confirmed that code has been produced that exploits a security bug affecting Microsoft SQL Server 2000, Microsoft SQL Server 2005 and Windows Internal Database, in certain configurations.

On the plus side, Microsoft SQL Server 7.0 Service Pack 4, Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 3, and Microsoft SQL Server 2008 are immune from the flaw. Third party apps that make use of the vulnerable code also appear to be in the clear.

The software giant stated that although exploit code exists it hasn't received any reports of attacks. Its advisory contains suggested workarounds.

Microsoft fails to mention this but Secunia reports that the flaw is the same bug discovered by SEC Consulting, which published an advisory on the security bug on 4 December. SEC Consulting only did this after months of dialogue with Microsoft.

A separate zero-day vulnerability became the subject of an out-of-sequence patch. That flaw is being hit far harder than the SQL server bug, which arguably presents a lower general risk for internet hygiene. Microsoft said it's investigating the SQL Server flaw, which past form would suggest is a candidate for a patch in either January or February as part of Microsoft's regular Patch Tuesday update cycle.

Security flaws in SQL Server are of interest well outside the data centre.

Hackers often use vulnerabilities in database software to plant malicious script that hijack internet sessions to serve up exploit code from systems under their control. The tactic forms the basis of drive-by download attacks, a class of assault that's become a preferred distribution route for Trojan code over recent years.®

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