Feeds

Orange sticks nose into e-books

Anything you Kindle, I Kindle better

Security for virtualized datacentres

Orange is pondering a foray into Kindle territory. Innovative network application is all very well, but the company wants to go further and make innovative devices to allow its customers to run up their bills in new and interesting ways.

Orange has been practising the delivery of daily newspapers over its 3G network for a while, using devices from iRex with a 3G dongle sticking out of the top. Those trials have apparently "gone well", and though the company representative wouldn't be drawn on the details, he did outline the kind of device Orange was developing to support such a service.

The company won't be trying to squeeze an e-book into punters' pockets; so no clever folding screens or wrap-around displays. But a flexible screen technology will be used to provide more resilience to knocks and bangs - this notion no doubt born out of a painful lesson learnt in the trials. That screen will be around eight inches, the same size as the first version of the Iliad device which was used in the trials. Newspapers and magazines will be sold by subscription, with the latest edition automatically delivered to the device over the phone network - just like the Kindle. It won't feature a keyboard, 'cos only an American would put a keyboard on a book.

One problem the company will need to consider is how the European regulator will react to a device which is locked to one network: Orange may be forced to include a removable SIM so the customer can change networks, after a contract of suitable length - Orange's device will be heavily subsidised to get the price below €100.

Orange has done hardware before, but something like this is more akin to the Orange LiveBox than a branded mobile handset. Punters buying an Orange e-book are buying into a service as well as a brand, and proving that Orange is a service-delivery company, not just an operator of networks. ®

Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate
Belay that toil, me hearty, and park your scurvy backside
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
In a spin: Samsung accuses LG exec of washing machine SABOTAGE
Rival electronic giant tries to iron out allegations
Lumia rebrand begins: Nokia's new UK web home is Microsoft.com
Yarr, them Nokia logos walking the plank and into the drink
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.