Feeds

US delays Royal Navy satellite comms project

Only 31 months late

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

A Royal Navy communications project is 31 months late because development of components at the US Department of Defense is behind schedule.

A National Audit Office (NAO) report on major Ministry of Defence (MoD) projects says the Naval Extremely High Frequency/Super High Frequency Satellite Communications Terminals programme relies on satellite and other equipment supplied by the US. It also says that the MoD has long experience of the risks arising from having very little real power to influence US projects.

"This key dependency was not identified as one of the top risks when the main investment decision was taken for the Naval Extremely High Frequency/Super High Frequency Satellite Communications Terminals project," says the report.

The programme will provide communications primarily for submarines. The report says that the ability to communicate at super high frequency will enable high capacity information exchange, although not in all environments. The extremely high frequency facility will enable the exchange of large volumes of information, while protecting against jamming and ensuring a submarine remains hard to detect.

The system is designed to be interoperable with the US and other allies. However, the NAO says that some of the specific details of the programme are classified and its analysis therefore "contains some generalised comments".

As a temporary solution, the MoD has developed a low cost interim communication system for both the existing Trafalgar Class submarines and the new Astute Class submarines. According to the NAO, this will lessen the potential capability gap.

The NAO's report found that nine MoD projects have got later over the past year.

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Microsoft says 'weird things' can happen during Windows Server 2003 migrations
Fix coming for bug that makes Kerberos croak when you run two domain controllers
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Cisco says network virtualisation won't pay off everywhere
Another sign of strain in the Borg/VMware relationship?
Forrester says Australia, not China, is next boom market for cloud
It's cloudy but fine down under, analyst says
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.