Feeds
60%

Satnav head-to-head: Navman S100 vs TomTom Go 540 Live

The biggest names' top-of-the-line satnavs slug it out

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The other Live service that impressed us was the Google search feature – simply bash in 'Halfords', for example, and it will perform an online search and then offer to route you to the nearest store. We much prefer this method to Navman’s Local Search, where you have to download local businesses to the S100 from your PC. The petrol price search on the TomTom wasn’t quite so impressive and rarely gave totally accurate pricing for the stations we visited – something that’s important if you’re going to make detour to save a few pennies at the pumps.

Navman S100

Clearer maps than the TomTom's

There is, however, a big fly in the ointment when it comes to TomTom’s Live services: you get three months' usage free, but then there's an £8-a-month charge.

We have few complaints for either product in relation to simple navigation. TomTom has the more colourful mapping, but Navman’s is slightly clearer, while both feature decent visual and vocal instructions, along with extras such as lane assistance on motorways.

Both also come with a variety of voices pre-installed. Choose a computerised voice and road names will be read out – there was very little to choose between the two in this respect, with both managing to make a decent fist of most road names. However, the TomTom will, for example, read out B2234 as “B twenty-two thousand and thirty-four”, which is plain annoying. If you’re particularly vain you can record your own voice instructions on the TomTom – good for a quick laugh, but nothing else.

The TomTom is by far the louder of the two, although we weren’t overly impressed with its attempt to adjust volume in line with in-car noise – in our tests it had very little effect.

Navman S100

Locks on to satellites quickly

Thanks to its built-in mic, the TomTom lets you give verbal instructions. This includes simple commands such as saying “decrease volume”, as well as being able to read out complete addresses. The latter actually work surprisingly well, although the voice control stops after you give a house number, leaving you to revert to the touchscreen to cancel warnings about toll roads etc.

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Bond villains lament as Wicked Lasers withdraw death ray
Want to arm that shark? Better get in there quick
Antarctic ice THICKER than first feared – penguin-bot boffins
Robo-sub scans freezing waters, rocks warming models
Your PHONE is slowly KILLING YOU
Doctors find new Digitillnesses - 'text neck' and 'telepressure'
SEX BEAST SEALS may be egging each other on to ATTACK PENGUINS
Boffin: 'I think the behaviour is increasing in frequency'
Reuse the Force, Luke: SpaceX's Elon Musk reveals X-WING designs
And a floating carrier for recyclable rockets
The next big thing in medical science: POO TRANSPLANTS
Your brother's gonna die, kid, unless we can give him your, well ...
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers
Windmills, solar, tidal - all a 'false hope', say Stanford PhDs
Britain's HUMAN DNA-strewing Moon mission rakes in £200k
3 days, and Kickstarter moves lander 37% nearer takeoff
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?