Feeds

US nuclear bomb lab develops 'self-warming' hand cream

Local owner-operator delighted

Security for virtualized datacentres

A New Mexico cosmetics entrepreneur has collaborated with a US government nuclear weapons lab to deal with one of the great scourges threatening society today, that of chilly handcream fresh from the jar. The solution: high-tech "personal care lotion" which warms itself up as it is "gently rubbed" on.

According to the Sandia National Laboratory, a cutting-edge project involving local handcream kingpin Kevin Mallory and Sandia's Duane Schneider - "the microencapsulation go-to guy at Sandia" has got on like a house on fire (not literally, unless there were some experimental mishaps we haven't been told about).

Microencapsulation, as its name suggests, involves mixing tiny capsules full of one kind of chemical into another. The two ingredients stay separate until force is exerted, rupturing the capsules and mixing them together. In this case, the two chemicals react to produce heat.

Previously microencapsulation has mainly been used in humdrum apps like scratch-and-sniff, but it seems that the Sandia nuke lab also has need for it on occasion - apparently Schneider's work normally involves "nuclear weapons, alternative energy, and nanoscience programs" rather than potentially spontaneously combustible or even explosive hand cream.

But it seems that in this case America's nuclear sword has been beaten into a delightful soothing self-warming handcream ploughshare, as it were. There's certainly no mention of any embarrassing overheating issues or anything like that.

Mallory describes the assistance of the nuclear bomb boffins as "absolutely fantastic ... I've been thinking about how lucky I am to live in a community where this kind of help is available."

There was no word on any future ointment or lotion with other intriguing capabilities - for instance the ability to start glowing when rubbed on. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
What's that STINK? Rosetta probe shoves nose under comet's tail
Rotten eggs, horse dung and almonds – yuck
Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
Kip Thorne explains how he created the black hole for Interstellar
Movie special effects project spawns academic papers on gravitational lensing
Experts brand LOHAN's squeaky-clean box
Phytosanitary treatment renders Vulture 2 crate fit for export
LONG ARM of the SAUR: Brachially gifted dino bone conundrum solved
Deinocheirus mirificus was a bit of a knuckle dragger
Moment of truth for LOHAN's servos: Our US allies are poised for final test flight
Will Vulture 2 freeze at altitude? Edge Research Lab to find out
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.