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Anti-radiation phone chip withdrawn from sale

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Do you remember our E-Waves anti-radiation chip story from last week? Well, the retailer behind the device has since withdrawn it from sale because of doubts over its capabilities.

Belgian pharmacy chain Omega Pharma has since said that, following launch of the E-Waves chip, a “storm of protest broke out during which scientific proof of doctors and professors was brought into doubt”, according to a Reuters report.

The chip was supposedly able to neutralise a phone’s potentially harmful rays by blasting out “a quantum physical information wave” towards your brain when a mobile is in use.

In an effort to get its message across at launch, Omega Pharma released contrasting thermal imaging shots of someone’s head during a mobile phone conversation. One picture showed how the user’s brain heated up when using an ordinary phone, while another image showed that the person’s cranium was kept cooler, allegedly thanks to the chip’s protection.

Omega Pharma has since decided to repeat some tests on the chip, after which it’s promised to publish the results. It’s still uncertain whether E-Waves will make a return in the future or if it’ll be distributed by other firms elsewhere.

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