Feeds

The benefits of co-ordinating dev and ops efforts

Yes, there are some. Really

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

The essential guide to IT transformation

Over the past few days here we’ve been considering the Chinese wall that can exist between development and operations teams. From a practical perspective, we know from research we ran a month or so ago that the picture ain’t quite so bad as some of the comments might suggest (Figure 1) – though it's interesting to note from the comments how bad things can get.

Well, here’s the upside. Organisations which do manage a close co-ordination between dev and ops really do reap the benefits. When we grouped the respondents to Figure 1 into 4 groups (mixing the uncoordinated responses with the small proportion that confessed working against each other, to yield a ‘Disjointed’ group), we found that those working in a collaborative manner generally were perceived as providing a better service than the others.

Indeed, looking at the two extremes, the ‘Collaborative’ group was seen as delivering IT services across the board, an order of magnitude better than their ‘Disjointed’ counterparts (Figure 2). Interestingly, the top responses equated directly to providing a higher level of service to users.

This does not make collaboration between the groups a panacea for all ills however. If we consider the main challenges, the two main issues facing most IT departments – project slippage and fire fighting – are only partially resolved for our Collaborative super-group. However, as can be seen in Figure 3, while these two points might be difficult to get right, the Disjointed group does seem to get most things wrong.

We could risk going into motherhood at this point but we won’t. The bottom line is, if you’re facing a lack of co-ordination between your development and ops teams, that’s probably the first thing to get sorted before you try to tackle anything else.

PS If you want to help us gauge the wider picture of IT-business communications, here’s a quick poll for the tea break.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain
Told to cough up more details as antitrust probe goes deeper
Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit
And at the back of the field, Windows 8.1 is sprinting away from Windows 8
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?