Feeds
75%

Roberts RDK-2 kitchen radio

A 'kitchen radio' actually designed for the kitchen

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Business security measures using SSL

Review Many radios are dubbed ‘kitchen radios’ solely for the reason that this is the room they end up getting most of their use in. Roberts has gone the whole hog and designed a radio specifically for kitchen use.

The first thing to note about the RDK-2 is that not only is it designed for the kitchen from a functionality perspective, it's intended to become part of the kitchen’s fixtures and fittings. It's designed to be mounted to the underside of a kitchen cupboard.

Roberts RDK-2

Roberts' RDK-2: at last, a kitchen radio designed for kitchens

It's not a bad idea this - radios that find a permanent home on a kitchen surface often become covered in all manner of grime and general stickiness. Still, a little DIY competence is needed to get the unit fitted, so if all your shelves end up wonky, this product is probably not for you.

For the rest of us, installation is straightforward. The cupboard you pick for mounting should be away from direct sources of heat. A good tip is to check the reception where you intent to hang the unit before doing the fixing. This sounds obvious, but it's one of those things that can easily get overlooked in the desire to get the unit up and running quickly.

Another thing that needs a bit of thought is making sure the power cord is long enough to reach a power point. In fact, Roberts could have helped by fitting a longer cord. The unit is supplied with a simple wire FM/DAB aerial which provides decent reception, but there's an F-type socket on the back also if you need to something more serious.

Roberts RDK-2

Have cupboard, have place to hang radio

When testing the proposed site for signal strength, if you're using the wire antenna, it’s a good idea to fix the aerial in the proposed spot with a bit of tape. Holding the aerial in place may well give a false reading. With aerials of this type, it's more usual to get the best signal by fixing the aerial vertically rather than horizontally - that was certainly the case with our unit. It's also a good make sure you're not near any water pipes or other metal objects as this can affect reception.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch
For decades Hollywood actually binned its 4K files. Doh!
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster
4 Minute Mile project hatched to speed up tired troops
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears
RIP 2001 – 2014. MP3 player beloved of millions. Killed by cloud
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.