Feeds

Lenovo touchscreen talker leaked online

OPhone's features still a mystery

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

A picture of Lenovo’s first foray into the mobile phone market has been leaked online.

lenovo_ophone

Is this Lenovo's OPhone?

Rumoured to be called the OPhone, the mystery device is – according to several online sources – thought to run on Google’s Android platform.

What we can ascertain from the picture is that the talker has a full touchscreen, with four Braille-like icons running along the bottom of the screen. These are probably used for placing and ending calls.

The only physical button we can see rests in-between these four icons and, if the iPhone’s anything to go by, will be used for accessing the OPhone’s main menu.

We can also just about make out a headphone connection image on the very bottom of the mystery talker, so it’s safe to say the device has a headphone port and is set-up for music and, like as not, video.

Sources have also reported that the Lenovo phone’s been designed to work for network operator China Mobile, which suggests that it may not wash up on Blighty’s fair shores for some time yet.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.