Feeds

Staff get the chop at London's web 2.0 poster child

CBS makes cuts at Last.fm

Remote control for virtualized desktops

CBS has layed off about 20 per cent of staff at music site Last.fm, the poster child for would-be web 2.0 millionaires in the UK.

As part of cuts across CBS' online properties, about 20 of Last.fm's 95 staff received the bad news yesterday, according to reports. Last.fm spokesman Christian Ward declined to comment.

CBS paid $280m for the unprofitable Shoreditch-based start-up in the frothier days of May 2007 as part of a big online push, betting that ad revenues would grow. It was founded by Martin Skitsel and Felix Miller in 2002 as an personalised internet radio service. They incorporated Richard Jones' Audioscrobbler in 2005, which allows users to log their listening habits.

All three became millionaires as a result of the sale.

The acquisition spree that brought Last.fm into CBS' Interactive division also saw it pay $1.8bn for CNet. Staff at CNet sites, including ZDnet UK, are also being made redundant. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
How to simplify SSL certificate management
Simple steps to take control of SSL certificates across the enterprise, and recommendations centralizing certificate management throughout their lifecycle.