Feeds

Closing the gap between development and operations

Two countries divided by a common language?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A few years ago, when I still had what could loosely be classed in this industry as a ‘proper’ job, I happened to be sitting in a meeting – the purpose of which was to plan the deployment of a new application. And things were not going well.

It didn’t help that the application had already been written, and the stated goal was to get the thing live within the following few weeks. It also didn’t help that it was the first time the head of IT operations, who was in the meeting, had even heard that the application existed. Unsurprisingly, he said that the timescales were impossible – and worse, he pointed out that the application wouldn’t be manageable by his team, not as defined at least.

We see plenty being written about how IT should work closer with the business. But do we still have communications divides within the IT department itself? Examples such as this one are hopefully not too common (though do let us know if your opinions differ). However, from the outsider’s perspective it does seem that we have two worlds, frequently operating in isolation.

As a result, we can end up with distinct differences of philosophy. Take configuration management, for example. From an ops perspective, this is a mechanism for dealing with planned changes to the IT environment. Meanwhile, from a developer perspective, it is a mechanism for managing the evolving state of software in development. Very similar, and yet very different – and as far as I know, thus far there has been little success in mapping one against the other – ITIL V3 may claim to deal with pre-deployment configuration management, but it does so from the perspective of ops, and not dev.

Meanwhile, the developer world continues to evolve. We ran a series of workshops a few weeks ago on the topic of agile development. But the one topic that didn’t come up was how frequent deliveries of software impose an additional load on IT operations. One can only imagine how the meeting above would have gone, if Mr Head-of-Ops had been told that there would be a new delivery every fortnight for the next two years.

Perhaps it is the case that for maximum efficiency, we need the development world to operate separately from operations so that each side can get on with their own tasks in the way that makes the most sense to them. Or perhaps we should recognise the issues caused by the historical separation between the two groups, and be striving to close the gap?

What do you think? We’d love to hear your views. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.