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PS3 Home is '2005 tech', says Xbox exec

Live vs Home. Fight, fight, fight...

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Sony's Home hasn’t even been out for 24 hours yet, but the PlayStation 3 online community has already attracted criticism from arch-rival Microsoft.

Aaron Greenberg, Group Product Manager for Xbox 360, told website Kotaku that he isn’t sure if Home is what people want, because it “feels like 2005 tech in 2008” and “Second Life for hardcore gamers”. Ouch.

Live – Microsoft’s own attempt at an online community, which was recently refreshed by the New Xbox Experience - is a much more “upscale experience” than Home, Greenberg claimed.

Home is free to download, although some sections will incur an access fee. Greenberg said gamers will be willing to fork out for Live, which costs roughly £35 ($52/€39) for 12 months of Gold-level membership, because it's better.

"I think we have seen people are willing to pay for the premium experience," Greenberg said. "When they compare Live, even to Home, there is still a huge gap.”

Home is available to download through the PS3 now. Live access can be bought online and from High Street stores.

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