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More mobile makers join Android alliance

Fourteen new recruits

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Open Handset Alliance, the Google-backed group behind Android, has recruited 14 more companies to work on the open-source mobile operating system.

The org's new members include major handset makers, mobile service providers, and chipmakers, including ARM, Asustek, Garmin, Huawei Technologies, Sony Ericsson, Toshiba, and Vodafone.

"New members will either deploy compatible Android devices, contribute significant code to the Android Open Source Project, or support the ecosystem through products and services that will accelerate the availability of Android-based devices," the group stated.

Mobile chipmaker ARM intends to share its processor know-how with the group, while most of the mobile punters promise that Android handsets will be forthcoming.

ASUS and Sony Ericsson specifically stated that Android devices are in the works, but didn't offer a time frame. Huawei said it would "deploy Android devices towards 2009."

Other firms joining the Android fold today are AKM Semiconductor, Atheros, Borqs, Ericsson, Omron, Softbank Mobile, and Teleca AB. ®

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