Feeds

Firm touts anti-radiation chip for phones

'Quantum physical information wave' technology employed

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

If you believe that mobile phone use puts your brain at risk from electromagnetic radiation, then a Belgian firm’s latest offering may put your mind at ease. It's a gadget that's said to neutralise a phone’s potentially harmful rays.

E_Waves_phone_chip_01

The E-Waves Phone Chip (it's the green dot)

The E-Waves Phone Chip is essentially a bulky sticker that attaches to the back of your handset and works by using “interference technology”.

When you make a call, the chip beams out - it says here - “a quantum physical information wave” towards your brain to neutralise any potentially harmful waves sent out by the phone. The E-Waves' radiation cancels out the phone's radiation, the company behind the project said. It revealed nothing else about the gadget.

Register Hardware is sceptical, to say the least, but the chip is nonetheless said by its maker to be the product of five years of research carried out by developer More Energy Solutions.

E_Waves_phone_chip_04

E-Waves' claimed effect in thermal scans (left to right):
No GSM call being received, GSM call being received but with no E-Waves in place, and GSM call received with E-Waves in place

In an effort to get its message across, distributor Omega Pharma has released contrasting thermal imaging shots of someone’s head during a mobile phone conversation. One picture shows how the user’s brain heated up when using an ordinary phone, whilst another image shows that the person’s cranium was kept cooler, allegedly thanks to the chip’s protection.

Numerous studies have already been conducted into the potentially harmful effects of mobile phone use. But it’s worth remembering that for each one that hinted at a link, others have found contrasting evidence.

If you believe the E-Waves Phone Chip claims, or just want to give it a try, then it will be available from tomorrow through Omega Pharma pharmacies in Belgium for around €40 (£35/$51). A UK-specific launch date hasn’t been called in yet, but a European rollout is expected to follow shortly.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Trousers down for six of the best affordable Androids
Stylish Googlephones for not-so-deep pockets
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.