Feeds

Aussie convicted over Simpsons sex pics

'My butt does not deserve a website'

The essential guide to IT transformation

An Australian man has lost his appeal against child pornography charges for possessing images of the Simpsons characters having sex.

The Supreme Court of New South Wales upheld a lower court's decision which found him guilty of possessing child pornography.

Alan John McEwan was convicted in February of possessing child pornography and using his computer to access child pornography because he had a series of cartoons based on the TV series The Simpsons including images of the children having sex.

Judge Adams noted that in some ways the figures do not imitate humans - they only have four digits on each hand and: "the faces have eyes, a nose and mouth markedly and deliberately different to those of any possible human being". The judgement said that the television series implied ages of about ten for Bart and eight for Lisa.

Adams said: "The question before me is whether a fictional cartoon character is a 'person' within the meaning of the statutory offences or, to be more precise, is a depiction or representation of such a 'person'."

The judge made clear there was a fundamental difference between depicting an acutal person and an imaginary person - he used the example of video games showing "terrible violence" which if it involved real people "would constitute crimes at the very highest level of the criminal calendar".

But by accepting that a person may be real or imaginary, and may be depicted by drawing then "a cartoon character might well constitute the depiction of such a person". McEwan was therefore guilty.

The judgment said there was no evidence that the material was or might be used for any criminal purpose.

McEwan was fined $3,000 and signed up to a two year good behaviour bond - punishment which the Supreme Court upheld.

Each side must pay its own costs. The full judgment is here.

Rude versions of Simpsons cartoons were a leading meme of the internet in the late 90s, second only to Star Trek jokes. Insurance firm Royal & Sun Alliance staff got into trouble for forwarding smutty Simpsons emails back in 2001. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Felony charges? Harsh! Alleged Anon hackers plead guilty to misdemeanours
US judge questions harsh sentence sought by prosecutors
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.