Feeds

Angel spots CherryPal cloud chimera

It's small and it's real

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

Though some claimed it didn't exist, the CherryPal cloud PC chimera has been spotted in the wild.

Max Seybold's new-age thin client/ultimate buzzword mash-up first went on sale in late July, but it wasn't until yesterday that someone outside the mystery company actually laid their eyes on a shipping system.

Over the summer, Seybold and Co. enlisted an army of "Brand Angels" to promote the 2-watt mini-machine in the blogosphere, promising the ultimate in Silicon Valley currency for their efforts: stock options. But after more than four months of waiting, not even these Marketing 2.0 mavens had received their units — despite claims to the contrary from Seybold.

First, there was talk of a graphics glitch. Then there was the tale of the disappearing funding pact with a "UK based African born family."

And then, yesterday afternoon, one Angel announced a sighting with a post to a private social network that CherryPal may or may not have set up. "MY CHERRYPAL ARRIVED!!!!" the Angel wrote.

The package lacked setup instructions. But the Angel was able to verify that the hardware exists. And that it's small.

"It is soooo tiny — like a compact make-up case," she later wrote on her blog. "It is even smaller than a paperback book — it's the size of a handheld Nintendo GameBoy — the original ones — about the size of the Nintendo DS (dual screen). If you take a standard 8 1/2-by-11-inch piece of printer paper and fold it in half, it is smaller than that."

The 10.5-ounce box is billed as a "cloud PC" that moves "most of the software and data that traditionally sits on the desktop to the Internet." In other words, it includes a small solid state drive, but it also taps into data and services sitting on Amazon S3 storage servers.

This morning, Seybold told us that all Brand Angels and anyone who's actually shelled out $249 for a CherryPal would receive their units by December 15. Previously, he had said that an initial batch of systems went out in early November, but there's no evidence this actually happened.

One Reg reader ordered a unit when the thin client cloud PC first went on sale, and after CherryPal suspended its pre-order program, he was told he could ask for a refund. He did — and twelve weeks passed without the return of his $250. But yesterday, Max Seybold sent him a personal email saying a check was on its way. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Nice computers don’t need to go to the toilet, says Barclays
Bad computers might ask if you are Sarah Connor
4K video on terrestrial TV? Not if the WRC shares frequencies to mobiles
Have your say with Ofcom now, before Freeview becomes Feeview
PEAK LANDFILL: Why tablet gloom is good news for Windows users
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever
YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS
Old hardware doesn't get any faster with new software
You didn't get the MeMO? Asus Pad 7 Android tab is ... not bad
Really, er, stands out among cheapie 7-inchers
Apple winks at parents: C'mon, get your kid a tweaked Macbook Pro
Cheapest models given new processors, more RAM
VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
And goes to the Genius Bar for support
Leaked Windows Phone 8.1 Update specs tease details of Nokia's next mobes
New screen sizes, dual SIMs, voice over LTE, and more
Microsoft stands on shore as tablet-laden boat sails away
Brit buyers still not falling for Windows' charms
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?