Feeds

Angel spots CherryPal cloud chimera

It's small and it's real

Build a business case: developing custom apps

Though some claimed it didn't exist, the CherryPal cloud PC chimera has been spotted in the wild.

Max Seybold's new-age thin client/ultimate buzzword mash-up first went on sale in late July, but it wasn't until yesterday that someone outside the mystery company actually laid their eyes on a shipping system.

Over the summer, Seybold and Co. enlisted an army of "Brand Angels" to promote the 2-watt mini-machine in the blogosphere, promising the ultimate in Silicon Valley currency for their efforts: stock options. But after more than four months of waiting, not even these Marketing 2.0 mavens had received their units — despite claims to the contrary from Seybold.

First, there was talk of a graphics glitch. Then there was the tale of the disappearing funding pact with a "UK based African born family."

And then, yesterday afternoon, one Angel announced a sighting with a post to a private social network that CherryPal may or may not have set up. "MY CHERRYPAL ARRIVED!!!!" the Angel wrote.

The package lacked setup instructions. But the Angel was able to verify that the hardware exists. And that it's small.

"It is soooo tiny — like a compact make-up case," she later wrote on her blog. "It is even smaller than a paperback book — it's the size of a handheld Nintendo GameBoy — the original ones — about the size of the Nintendo DS (dual screen). If you take a standard 8 1/2-by-11-inch piece of printer paper and fold it in half, it is smaller than that."

The 10.5-ounce box is billed as a "cloud PC" that moves "most of the software and data that traditionally sits on the desktop to the Internet." In other words, it includes a small solid state drive, but it also taps into data and services sitting on Amazon S3 storage servers.

This morning, Seybold told us that all Brand Angels and anyone who's actually shelled out $249 for a CherryPal would receive their units by December 15. Previously, he had said that an initial batch of systems went out in early November, but there's no evidence this actually happened.

One Reg reader ordered a unit when the thin client cloud PC first went on sale, and after CherryPal suspended its pre-order program, he was told he could ask for a refund. He did — and twelve weeks passed without the return of his $250. But yesterday, Max Seybold sent him a personal email saying a check was on its way. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
End of buttons? Apple looks to patent animating iPhone sidewalls
Filing suggests handset with display strips
Samsung Gear S: Quick, LAUNCH IT – before Apple straps on iWatch
Full specs for wrist-mounted device here ... but who'll buy it?
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?
Tip: Put the shades on and you'll look less of a spanner
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.