Feeds

New .tel domains bid to be world's phone book

HELLO? I'm in the DNS! No, it's rubbish

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

The latest top level domain extension - .tel - opens for business today with a new twist on the DNS.

Rather than merely act as a memorable address for a website, a .tel domain is designed to serve as a repository for contact data. By listing phone numbers, websites, Google keywords, physical addresses and email addresses in their .tel entry, the registry's operators have it, companies and individuals can make themselves much easier to get hold of.

By giving customers your .tel domain, you can do the work of keeping details of your contact channels up-to-date for them, the pitch goes. A move of premises could be simplified by a quick edit of your .tel entry.

Using the DNS to store such data rather than simply mapping web addresses to IP addresses is "the most significant innovation in the domain name system since the advent of .com", according to Khashayar Mahdavi, the CEO of London-based Telnic, which is operating the .tel registry.

Although .tel sales are only open to brand owners until February 3 (the "sunrise" period for new domain extensions), Telnic also plans to market registry to individuals who want to manage their social life and career online. Their .tel data could include MySpace and Facebook links, CV information and IM contacts.

Telnic is encouraging developers to integrate .tel into mobile applications in the hope it will take off as a system to help users avoid the hassle of entering new contact details. Owners of .tel domains could choose to include their mobile location in their entry, if they're into that sort of thing.

After the "sunrise", there will be a "landrush" period until March 24, when the best .tel domains will be sold at a premium. General availability will follow when a .tel will cost about £15 per year. Brand owners are being charged £280 today.

Recent new domain registry launches pitching their own unique selling point, such as .mobi, which pitched itself last year as the TLD for mobile-optimised websites, have proved less than spectacular. Industry observers including Nominet, which runs .uk, have suggested the proliferation of new domain extensions may be exhausting the market.

Telnic will be hoping .tel is unique enough to rouse it. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?