Feeds

Top transport plod to probe Tory leaker's arrest

'Erm, whose idea was this?'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The country's top transport police officer has been appointed by the Met to investigate the decisions that led to its arrest of Tory front bencher Damian Green last week for leaking Home Office documents to the media.

British Transport Police chief constable and ACPO crime committee chairman Ian Johnston will report interim findings within seven days and deliver a final report within two weeks, acting Met commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson said this morning

Green's arrest has prompted fierce criticism from MPs on all sides of the House who view it as a threat to their duty to hold the government to account. Green and Christopher Galley, the 26-year-old civil servant who passed him several immigration documents, have both argued they acted in the public interest.

Home secretary Jacqui Smith has denied any prior knowledge of plans by counter-terror officers to detain Green and raid his home and parliamentary offices.

Stephenson, who wants to take over from Ian Blair as permanent Met commissioner, said: "I am properly concerned about the issues being raised within the continuing debate surrounding the ongoing investigation into the leaking of Government information.

"I have therefore appointed Ian Johnston, Chairman of ACPO crime committee and chief constable of the British Transport Police, to conduct an urgent review of our decisions, actions and handling of the investigation to date and to provide me with an interim report within seven days and a final report within two weeks.

"In the meantime the investigation team will be meeting with the CPS to review progress and consider next steps."

Johnston was assistant commissioner of the Met until 2003. The British Transport Police are controlled by the Department of Transport rather than the Home Office.

Tomorrow the Speaker of the House of Commons will make a statement on last week's swoop following the State Opening of Parliament. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
China hopes home-grown OS will oust Microsoft
Doesn't much like Apple or Google, either
Super Cali signs a kill-switch, campaigners say it's atrocious
Remote-death button bad news for crooks, protesters – and great news for hackers?
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Fast And Furious 6 cammer thrown in slammer for nearly three years
Man jailed for dodgy cinema recording of Hollywood movie
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?