Feeds

MPs lost for Word over creaking Microsoft packages

And politicos want YouTube exposure

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

MPs have logged a massive support call with Microsoft after they ended up at the wrong end of the tech world's fitful migration to Office 2007.

Meanwhile Westminster’s hapless Web 2.0 foray continued this week with politicians lobbying to place clips of themselves in the House of Commons on YouTube.

Microsoft is working with Westminster’s tech support, the Parliamentary Information and Communication Technology service (PICT) to enable MPs and peers to open Word 2007 documents in their Office 2003 software.

Compatibility is causing a big headache among politicians and civil servants who are unable to access some correspondence because the documents were created in Word 2007.

According to the “Information Committee Annual Report 2007-2008”, released on 25 November, the lack of compatibility “will be resolved in conjunction with Microsoft”, which is currently working with Westminster’s technology bods.

PICT, which was established on 1 January 2006, has come under sharp criticism in the past from cheesed-off politicos who have fulminated against the “poor” service.

MPs have also complained about their email inboxes being overstretched, as a result the Committee confirmed that the size of “Members’ email boxes [sic]” would be increased.

In the meantime, parliamentary types are also keen to grab some Web 2.0-stylie limelight.

Some MPs want their appearances in the Commons Chamber to be shown on video-sharing websites such as YouTube. Peers in the House of Lords have also expressed interest, the Committee said.

Others would like users to be able to embed Parliamentary footage into their own blogs and websites. However, under the terms of the current Parliamentary Broadcasting Unit Ltd (PARBUL) licences, embedding is forbidden.

The PARBUL director is mulling the possibility, according to the Committee’s report.

The Committee added it “welcomed a wide range of improvements to the parliamentary website,” and said it’s “excited” by the programme of virtual tours being developed. ®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
ONE EMAIL costs mining company $300 MEEELION
Environmental activist walks free after hoax sent share price over a cliff
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
Help yourself to anyone's photos FOR FREE, suggests UK.gov
Copyright law reforms will keep m'learned friends busy
Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.