Feeds
75%

Samsung Q1 music and video player

Sleek, svelte and very nicely priced

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

In general, we found it far too easy to select up/down/left/right when we meant to select action, and vice-versa, especially when navigating the smaller context-menus. Giving the navigation pad some degree of movement - or even some sort of haptic feedback - would make the Q1 an easier and more pleasant device to use.

Samsung YP-Q1

The familiar Samsung main menu layout

Above the left and right points of the diamond are controls to move back to the previous screen and to open up the relevant contextual menu. Again, these controls are solid and offer no tactile feedback whatsoever. And for some reason they're not backlit like the surround of the diamond, so tapping them is a curiously unsatisfying and uncertain undertaking.

When you actually touch the right control the Q1 responds quickly. Scanning through media is particularly effective, the scan speed ramping up quickly smoothly. But though the Q1 may look great, we prefer the controls on the latest Sony Walkman devices or the Sansa Fuze, all of which actually move when used.

The Q1 uses the now familiar Samsung menu layout, with nine icons giving access to your music, videos, pictures, text files, the RDS FM radio, datacasts, file browser, device settings and Prime Pack, the latter including a voice-recording facility, three games and colour maps of all the world's major underground railway networks.

Of all the major manufacturers, Samsung has long been among the more generous with out-of-the-box audio codec support. The Q1 is no exception, supporting MP3, Ogg Vorbis, Flac and WMA audio codecs. The Q1 can also handle TXT, JPEG, PNG, BMP and GIF files.

Video playback is limited to WMV9 and .SVI MPEG-4 files, the latter being nothing more than an AVI container modified by Samsung to “create” a proprietary video format that has no earthly benefit beyond ensuring that people have to use Samsung's bundled software to convert their videos.

Samsung YP-Q1

EmoDio: a decent video transcoding tool
Click for full-size image

Thankfully, the bundled Windows-only EmoDio media management package is a decent enough transcoding tool, and Samsung, unlike Sony, doesn't demand you pay extra for the benefit of using it as such.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.