Feeds

IBM updates power management for servers

Putting a cap on with a plug-in

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

It took a little bit longer than expected, perhaps, but IBM has finally delivered its Active Energy Manager plug-in for its Systems Director system management tool. The tool can be used to monitor power consumption and thermal conditions of IBM and non-IBM systems, as well as capping the power that can be used on selected server models.

The AEM plug-in runs on Linux partitions on Power, X64, or mainframe iron, and it can reach out into Windows, Linux, AIX, z/OS, and i 6.1 partitions on those various machines and keep them inside power consumption and thermal boundaries set by system administrators.

Last week, IBM rolled out V4.1 of the AEM tools, one for System z mainframes and one for all the other server platforms. Both updates have features that allow them to reach out into power distribution units inside of computer racks and see what power they are consuming, allowing administrators to monitor at the rack level as well as at the server level in their data centers. The new version of the plug-in can also do power capping based on a group level, such as all the blades in a chassis or all the servers in a rack, and has support for the new Power6-based Power 520 and 550 machines announced in October as well as for Power6-based JS12 and JS22 blades, which were not supported in the earlier version. You can monitor energy use on any Power System or System z mainframe, but only Power6 or X64 machines support power capping. You need Systems Director V6.1 to use AEM V4.1, and the updated software includes a web console, which means you no longer need to install client software on your administration PC to use the tool.

Because this is the new IBM, prices were not announced, but the pricing of the product is based on a tiered scheme not unlike that used for other systems software on AIX and i boxes.

You can find out more about the AEM plug-in for Power servers here, for X64 servers here, and for Linux on System z servers here.

Copyright © 1996-2008 Guild Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Hey, what's a STORAGE company doing working on Internet-of-Cars?
Boo - it's not a terabyte car, it's just predictive maintenance and that
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.