Feeds

When does a system become legacy?

The hero to zero of IT systems

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Last time we were interested in understanding a bit more about the state of our IT systems, and whether we were being held back by what we could loosely term 'legacy'. Perhaps a trickier question to answer however, is how we decide whether a system is legacy or not.

In the ideal world, when we built IT systems, we'd do so with a good understanding of requirements, and quickly enough that it would deliver a useful service on day one. Even if we had such an IT Shangri-La however, it would only remain so for a short while. Things change, and so therefore does the relevance of any given system. All systems follow some kind of decay curve, where consecutive events impact on a system's effectiveness such that after a point, the benefits of having the system in place no longer outweigh its costs.

To further complicate things, we need to keep in mind that we're not thinking about monolithic and isolated application stacks any more. Modern systems are more likely to be integrated with each other, and have dependencies with off the shelf components such as workflow engines and content management tools. Perhaps we should even throw virtualisation into the pot - is a legacy application running on a legacy OS still legacy, if the whole lot is packaged up into a virtual image running on a blade server?

How, then, should legacy be measured? Is it worth reviewing systems for such things as "functional coverage" (OK, I just made that up) and 'business relevance', or is it just a case of waiting for the complaints to reach a certain level? Are there any tell-tale signs of when a system slips in the value rankings, and should therefore be relegated to legacy status? Or is the only valid approach to be ad-hoc and reactive, to deal with the fall-out of decisions such as new system deployments, merger activity and so on? Let us know what you think.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Nexus 7 fandroids tell of salty taste after sucking on Google's Lollipop
Web giant looking into why version 5.0 of Android is crippling older slabs
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
SLURP! Flick your TONGUE around our LOLLIPOP – Google
Android 5 is coming – IF you're lucky enough to have the right gadget
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Internet Security Threat Report 2014
An overview and analysis of the year in global threat activity: identify, analyze, and provide commentary on emerging trends in the dynamic threat landscape.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.