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GeoCities 2.0 auctions self on eBay

88 domain names, admin tools, provisional patent, and more!

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In the summer of 2006, at the height of the digerati's Web 2.0 frenzy, social networking startup Kiko.com sold itself on eBay. The share-your-appointments-with-the-world online calendar extravaganza was pulling in exactly zero dollars a month. But after a flurry of late bidding, eBayers decided it was worth $258,100.

Now, ClutterMe.com is hoping to duplicate this gimick. Unlike the 2006 Kiko, the instantly-build-your-own-website website is actually profitable. According to founder Mark Molckovsky, the company is pulling in about $4,000 a month selling dedicated domain names to on-the-fly web designers. But Kiko didn't attempt to eBay itself while a melting world economy threatened to destroy Web 2.0 as we know it.

If you're interested in shelling out at least $12,375 for a modestly profitable GeoCities rethink, you can lay down a bid here. All this could be yours:

  • Exclusive ownership of all source code and documentation for Clutterme.com
  • The domains Clutterme.com, Cludderme.com, Cluterme.com, Cluderme.com, Clutterme.us, Clutterme.org, Clutterme.us, Clutterme.ca, and Clutter.me
  • An extensive list of Admin features, including deleting accounts, payment reporting, IP monitoring, mass e-mailing, template insertion, and more!
  • 88 domain purchases (with most users set to renew sometime next year)
  • A provisional patent for "a system and method of creating content online"

Yes, you can patent such a thing. This is America. Basically, ClutterMe's system and method allows html-challenged people to build web pages simply by typing letters straight into a wide open browser window. You can try it out here.

Molckovsky believes the entire operation will sell for around $60,000. "That's what I think the economy can handle right now," he tells The Reg.

He and his partner are selling the site because they wanna go to grad school. And they're strapped for cash. ®

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