Feeds

World hunts CherryPal cloud PC chimera

Have you seen the 2 watt mini machine?

SANS - Survey on application security programs

People are beginning to wonder if Max Seybold's sandwich-sized wonder machine really exists.

The CherryPal CEO says his 2-watt thin client cloud PC finally shipped on November 4, after months of delays. But a chorus of CherryPal "Brand Angels" - Web 2.0 denizens enlisted to promote the product in the blogosphere - say they've yet to see any hardware.

"I know I'm not alone in suspecting that all the promises of shipments and funding up until now were a ruse - as far as I can tell, there's not a single CherryPal computer out in the wild yet, and I'm starting to doubt that there'll ever be," one Brand Angel says on a private social network the company may or may not have set up for these blog-happy reviewers.

Seybold has fashioned his Mountain View-based operation as a mashup of every buzzphase now gripping the minds of the worldwide digerati, from cloud computing to green tech to, yes, user generated content. Each Brand Angel was promised a free cloudy, green machine - and perhaps free stock options - in exchange for some online viral marketing. But the Brand Angel social network includes 106 members, and none say they've received a system.

In June, the CherryPal CEO told The Reg that his Freescale-powered mini-machine would outpace both your Vista desktop and your beloved Macintosh. And little more than a month later, the startup began taking pre-orders at $249 a pop, telling buyers that units would ship within a matter of days.

Seybold and company promised a 10.5-ounce box that moves "most of the software and data that traditionally sits on the desktop to the Internet." The unit would include a small solid state drive, but it would also tap into data and services sitting on Amazon's S3 cloud.

Shot of the wee CherryPal

Have you seen me?

Then the company said a snafu involving its graphics hardware would push shipments back at least two weeks. Then two months passed. But Seybold insisted his mystery machine would finally make its debut on November 4, US election day.

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Next page: Halloween tale

More from The Register

next story
Samsung Galaxy S5 fingerprint scanner hacked in just 4 DAYS
Sammy's newbie cooked slower than iPhone, also costs more to build
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
Leaked photos may indicate slimmer next-generation iPad
Will iPad Air evolve into iPad Helium?
Feast your PUNY eyes on highest resolution phone display EVER
Too much pixel dust for your strained eyeballs to handle
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code
Slow and kludgy rollout will protect corporate profits
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.