Feeds

Dassault to build aerospace-factory Sims

Gaming engines to model complex aviation projects

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Graphic engines used in the latest videogames are set to be see more and more service in the French aerospace industry, according to reports.

French aviation and techweapon firm Dassault Systemes is especially keen on the idea, according to its R&D veep Pascal Lecland.

"We want more and more realistic simulations and we want to simulate everything including the supply chain. [Airbus and Boeing's] problems were with the supply chain," he said, speaking to Flight International this week.

Dassault has already bought the software company Virtools, which builds products used by the gaming industry - in particular by another France-based globocorp, Ubisoft. Virtools also makes developer kit for the Sony PSP, among other things.

Dassault, according to Flight, doesn't want to simulate aircraft performance so much as manufacturing processes. The game engines will be used to create a full simulation of building and maintaining a plane, missile or whatever through its entire lifecycle.

Such a project can involve parts and exotic materials from all over the world, sometimes travelling by unusual and limited channels such as special transport aircraft or unique barges. Then, unforeseen bottlenecks in assembly can paralyse the whole complicated dance, leaving thousands of workers standing idle and expensive supplies sitting in storage and hurting company accounts. This sort of thing happened with a vengeance in the Airbus A380 superjumbo programme, for instance, with wiring difficulties stalling the entire Europe-spanning production line and damaging sales (and prices) for years.

In other words, Dassault will be making something a lot more like The Sims than Flight Simulator. It seems that the necessary processing grunt will be substantial, calling for hefty clusters and grids.

There's no detail on just which new Dassault projects will be gamed through in advance, however. Indeed, there's a slight whiff here of marketing for the simulation developer tools themselves, which Dassault/Virtools would like to sell to as many other companies as possible.

Read the Flight story here. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.