Feeds

Dassault to build aerospace-factory Sims

Gaming engines to model complex aviation projects

High performance access to file storage

Graphic engines used in the latest videogames are set to be see more and more service in the French aerospace industry, according to reports.

French aviation and techweapon firm Dassault Systemes is especially keen on the idea, according to its R&D veep Pascal Lecland.

"We want more and more realistic simulations and we want to simulate everything including the supply chain. [Airbus and Boeing's] problems were with the supply chain," he said, speaking to Flight International this week.

Dassault has already bought the software company Virtools, which builds products used by the gaming industry - in particular by another France-based globocorp, Ubisoft. Virtools also makes developer kit for the Sony PSP, among other things.

Dassault, according to Flight, doesn't want to simulate aircraft performance so much as manufacturing processes. The game engines will be used to create a full simulation of building and maintaining a plane, missile or whatever through its entire lifecycle.

Such a project can involve parts and exotic materials from all over the world, sometimes travelling by unusual and limited channels such as special transport aircraft or unique barges. Then, unforeseen bottlenecks in assembly can paralyse the whole complicated dance, leaving thousands of workers standing idle and expensive supplies sitting in storage and hurting company accounts. This sort of thing happened with a vengeance in the Airbus A380 superjumbo programme, for instance, with wiring difficulties stalling the entire Europe-spanning production line and damaging sales (and prices) for years.

In other words, Dassault will be making something a lot more like The Sims than Flight Simulator. It seems that the necessary processing grunt will be substantial, calling for hefty clusters and grids.

There's no detail on just which new Dassault projects will be gamed through in advance, however. Indeed, there's a slight whiff here of marketing for the simulation developer tools themselves, which Dassault/Virtools would like to sell to as many other companies as possible.

Read the Flight story here. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
US taxman blows Win XP deadline, must now spend millions on custom support
Gov't IT likened to 'a Model T with a lot of things on top of it'
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.