Feeds

Google torches own brand Sadville

'Lively' wasn't

HP ProLiant Gen8: Integrated lifecycle automation

Could it be there isn't a pot of gold at the end of the Sadville rainbow? Google doesn't think there is, and will shutter its "virtual world" Lively after less than six months.

Lively was opened in July under the Google Labs banner, the clearing house for unfinished or pointless products. Its closure merited two and a bit paragraphs on the official Google blog yesterday.

"The Lively Team" wrote: "Despite all the virtual high fives and creative rooms everyone has enjoyed in the last four and a half months, we've decided to shut Lively down at the end of the year. It has been a tough decision, but we want to ensure that we prioritize our resources and focus more on our core search, ads and apps business."

Google hasn't released usage data for for Lively, but we'd confidently guess the name is somewhat ironic. Users are encouraged by the Lively team to "capture your hard work by taking videos and screenshots of your rooms" before the lights go out.

In function Lively is similar to Sadville, but there's no software to download and users can embed 3D chatrooms in websites. Google also pitched its cartoonish environs as more family friendly and less likely to be attacked by swarms of flying penises.

Despite its famous corporate hubris, Google didn't have the Ponzi-esque cojones to flog "virtual land" to gullible strategy boutiques and people in unhappy marriages, as Linden Lab does in Sadville.

Instead, in common with all Google products, the long term plan was to plaster Lively with advertising. But the current economic clusterfuck has prompted even the Big G to examine its outgoings. Could it be that the main reason the few people who inhabit Sadville do so in order to pursue niche sexual interests? Erm, yes*. Are those people likely to be a target for major advertisers? Erm, no.

Look out for much more of this in the coming months as Silicon Valley executives realise setting towers of cash on fire would be more profitable and entertaining than many of their webtarded "pre-revenue" products. ®

*Oh, and attend IBM marketing events.

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Captain Kirk sets phaser to SLAUGHTER after trying new Facebook app
William Shatner less-than-impressed by Zuck's celebrity-only app
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.